(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Historical atlas map of Solano County, California"

CALIFORNl 



A.NA ^WllWWIgfc. 



^P^ 




f9ie,794_So41i^ 



PREFACE. 



TO THE PEOPLE OF SOLANO COUNTY 
"We return thanks for the confidence they reposed in our ability to 
make fi Historical Atlas that should do credit to their county, and for 
tlie generous patronage tliey afforded ue. 

In pi-esenting this work, we hope it may appear to onr patrons that 
their confidence was not misplaced, and that an adequate return has been 
made for the pecuniary support they rendered us. 

"We have conscientiously endeavored to prepare an Atlas equal in all 
particulars to the representations we made in hehalf of it, and equal also 
to the expectations entertained of it by our patrons. 

We are not rash enough to presume that the work is absolutely fault- 
less, neither do 'we believe that a generous and intelligent community 
would demand that degree of perfection in a work of this kind. 

Few people, without actual experience, can comprehend the details of 
Eucli a work, — its cost, and the care and pains necessary to bring it to 
completion. 

"We have spared neither money nor labor to make it as nearly perfect 
as possible; but if some minor errors have crept into the map work of a 



county having irregular surveys and uneven topography, we shall not 
be surprised. 

While our labors were progressing in the county we were constantly 
the recipients of courtesies and favors from all classes of citizens, to 
whom we return our thanks. 

Our acknowledgments are especially due to the Board of Supervisors, 
and to the county officials and their deputies, who have at all times 
aided us in gathering from the records such facts as were needed. 

To the public-spirited and gentlemanly members of the Press we 
return thanks for the interest taken in and encouragement afforded onr 
enterprise. 

To many old settlers, whose years of honorable toil have transformed 
the wild prairie into harvest-laden fields, we acknoivledge our obligations 
for historical and biographical incidents connected Avith the early history 
of the county. 

That the convenience and ufUity'of the work we have presented will 
be seen and appreciated by the public generally, is the hope and belief 
of the pubiishere. 



~] 



II 



mi m. 



3t)Ue of California 

County Map, colored by Townaliips 

Map Number One 

» Two 
Three 

" Four 

" Five 

" Six, 

" Seven 

" Eiglit 



FAOE 

. 6,7 
. 22 
. 23 
26,27 
30,31 
34,35 
3S, 39 
42,43 
46,47 
. 50 



€MY, WOWN, A^m rXhhA^m JPIdkTS* 



Plat of Vnoavillc . 

" Elmira . 

" Rio Vista 
Vallejo 
Beniaia 

Fairfield and Suisun 
Dison 

Bridgeport . 
Penverton . 



30 
35 
43 
50,51 
53 
57 
60 
50 
47 



T£BWS iJ¥B miiVSTnAmo^B* 



BaS3ford, J. M., Jr. 58, 59 

Benicia Arsenal "5 

Bcaicia Brewery 56 

Berry, Geo. M 56 

Bridgeport Hotel 33 

Bruning, Joaepli (Rio Vifita) 44 

Buck, L. W 24 

Cnntfillow, W 68,59 

Court-House 8 

Conotj Infirmary 32 

DanielB, G. N 56 

Donell, Wm 28 

Galbraith, Jas 33 

Gardiner, John H 26 



SnSCEiiliANEOirS. 



History 

Statistical . 

Patrons' County Directory 



PlOE 

. • 62,63 
HawKina, A. 0. .-•■.•• 

■ ■ 56 
Henderson, H. t 

Hooper, T. T. ^^ 

Jones, J. W 

Johnson &■ Emigh . 

Koms, Levi 

. - 36 
Mann, D. L ^^ ^^ 

Mayes, John S. ' " " ' 

. 41- 
McCreary, D ' " 

McGettigan, B. 

Mein, Eobt. 

56 
Miles, Jas. L 

^- T -R .... 33 

Mizner, li. ii. - 

Newtown Landing (Eio Vista) 

Nurse, S. K. (Denverton) *^ 

Pioneer Brewery * 

33 
Pittnian, Mra. C. J 

Pleasants, W. J ^^ 

Pratt, L. A. ^^ 

Quiet, "Wm ^^ 

Eueger, John . - 

33 
Solano Brewery 

91 
Starr Flouring Mills 

90 
Stewart, Samuel " 

St. Augustine's College """ 

St. Catherine's Academy 54, 55 

St. Dominic's Monastery 

St. Gertrude's Academy ^ 

St. Mary of the Pacific ^^ 

Tisdale, H. D ^^ 

Toffson, W. B ^^ 

Turner, W. H ^? 

U. S. Areeoal ^^ 

View of Denverton 

Village of Rio Vista ** 

Weidenman & Rothenbusch - - ■ - *»■> 

Williams, Frank "■ 

Wingfield, J. H. D ■ • ■ • ^^ 



9-15 
16-20 
65-68 






M 



i^ihyMi^^r^. 









,.*'^'fj 






VA 



■</ 






-a». 






•r-^. 









-p-^r^ 



*<^ 






■'?t^l 



-'.m' 



L^- 



ro 



Vim 



. ■»/ ' 



/ 






p ' 



^ill 



'•N; 



^Il4r^^ 



\i 






\ 



.J^Pl 



\ 



V 



'i 



>^ 



r 



; « 



A 



-I— 



V 10 .) V I 'I 



T^'i 



0' 




.v^' 


'% 


et 






.'' •-■ 


"-?T 


J 




1 *1 


' _y 


a 


I 


. 


o ; ; 


/ 


Jl 


1 


4 




J A 


^1 


R 




/I 


A 


i 





^-^fe^tii 



CAi^^.^'"^-^^ ^ ( 




/■. 



.'/ 









^i»ri 






?H/ 



V 



4^ r 



=r*'" 



•--(-- 




sffi! 



•rt-j 



'/c. 





n 












4 - . 










^/ - -* :^' J 4iA^ .-^U :->?. 







-^ 



..^.L-' 



4 . 



P^ 



.W_^ 




* ^r 



-4'&«- 



'M 





-^1? _ ^ 







U 



^mii 






/f 










■s:ii:-i: 



^^ 














rr^'^t 



^/.■• 



rt : a*" 5 1' ■ 

■ .;^^_ > ^ 









^j - 1 



K r'^ 



4 








A 



C 









-<■ 



\ 






I 








lit 






T?a; 



■ >^ 



As ' 






^*;^' til 




*>' 



s i 



T' 



r ■■ . ^ V> 1 *i» , ■■■. :^ .t.j.l 

... . ,rtu I ' . ^ 




%ni^" 





HISTORY OF SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFOENIA. 



' * nfln ( 



Tug flubjoct of ttiis historical sketch, although not tho largest in 
nrea, nut the most populous, not the wealthieat county of California, 
Dcvcrthulcss lias a nnmc and a history fraught with the same degree of 
int4!rcat to its inhubitants, nt host, as those of any county of the Golden 
State. Hero, as elsewhere, the ailveiitUTous pioneer, who had put tho 
mounlainsand plains ofaeoutinentbctwecii himself and the aHsoeiations 
of Ilia e^rly life, encountered tho dangers, and sufTered the hardships 
that could bo endured only by those who had " the stuff that heroes 
are made of." 

Tho invitation that nature hero proffered those who had the hardi- 
hood to uecept it was not to bo rejected. Tlie salubrity of the climate 
bad nut its parallel in the native places of the pioneers. The soil 
yielded up itB bounty in unstinted measure, and tho arms of the ocean 
reached out to bear It down to the highways of comnieree. The aet- 
tlera of this county did not err in judgment when they sought here 
their homes. 

The evidence of their wisdom is seen in the orchards and vineyards 
that dot the hillsides ; in the luxuriant harvests that lie upon the val- 
leys ; in the busy maris of trade, and in the thousands of happy homes 
wherein dwell peace and contentment. 

It' any lack of interest attaches to this county, it is because fortune 
has smiled lc£a benignly than nature. Like individuals, the county 
has had its great espeotntions, and at au early day narrowly escaped 
the honor of eoutaining within its borders the permanent scat of the 
St)ite government. In mitigation of that disappointment, however, it 
is some consolation to know that while the State capital w.ia seeking 
Eorae permanent abiding place, it deigned to pay the cities of Vallejo 
and Bonioia flying visits. 

The situation of the county, witJiout minute details of its productions, 
would suggest the seat of prosperity and wealth. It lies in the great 
Sacramento valley, within easy access to the metropolis of the Pacific 
coast, nod has a greater number of miles fronting upon navigable watet^ 
than any county of the State. 

BOUNDARIES. 

Tho boundaries of the county are mainly natural, being Yolo and 
Napa counties, the river De los Putos, or Putah creek, on the north ; 
Tola couoty and the Sacramento river on the east; the Sacramento 
river, the Suisun and San Pablo bays, and the straits of Carquincz on 
the south ; on the west, San Pablo bay and the crest of the Suscol 
hills and Blue mountains. 

Within these boundaries is conttiined an area of about 672,000 acres, 
of which 100,000 arc swamp and overflowed lands, — 60,000 being 
Bait marsh and 40,000 fresh-water tide. Of this swamp land, about 
30,000 acres have been levied in and reclaimed, placing it among the 
most productive land of the county. 

Along the western bouodary are high chaparral hills; but, with the 
exception of these and the Montezuma hills, the county consists of 
plains and rolling prairies. The arable land comprises about 4:35,000 
acres. 

CIVIL DIVISIONS. 

Tlie civil divisions — not including incorporated towns and cities — 
comprise twelve townships, — Vallejo, Bonicia, Green Valley, Suisun, 
Montezuma, Denverton, Rio Vista, Maine Prairie, Elmira, Vacaville, 
Silveyville, and Tremont. 

Out of those twelve townships are formed forty-five public school 
districts, — Alamo, American Caiion, Benicia, Binghampton, Bunker 
Hill, Center, Collinsville, Crystal, Denverton, Dlkoo, Dover, Canright, 
Eghert, Esmeralda, Fairfield, Gomer, Grant. Green Valley, King, 
Maine Prairie, Montezuma, Horning Light, Oakdale, Owens, Peaceful 
Glen, Peiia, Pitts, Pleasants' Valley, Pulah, Rio Vista, Rockville, 
Round Hill, Lagoon, Salem, Silveyville, Slough, Solano, Suisun, Toland, 
Tromout, Ulattis, Union, Vallejo, Wolfskill, and Willow Springs. 

PRINCIPAL STREAMS. 

No streams of any considerable size traverse the county, although 
navigable waters largely constitute the boundary. 

IC/ie Itio de los Patos rises in Lake county; flows a general easterly 
direction, constituting the northern boundary of tho county, and empdea 
into the fresh-water tides of the Sacramento. 

Sweeney Creek rises in the Vaca hilb, six miles north of Vacaville; 
flows in a northeasterly direction for the distjmce of about eight miles ; 



thence in a southeasterly coutse to the vicinity of Maine Prairie, and 
empties into Cache creek slough. 

Vltillis Creel: rises in the Vaea hills, about; five miles northwest of 
Vacaville; flows through Vacaville in an easterly direction, and empties 

into the west branch of Cache creek slough. 

Alamo Creek rises about four miles west of Vacaville ; runs a south- 
easterly direction through Elmira, and enters Ulattis creek nciir Bing- 
hampton. 

Pteusfinls' Yaltei/ Crei:k rises about two miles west of Mr, M. K. 
Miller's place; runs in a northeasterly directiun through Pleasants' 
valley, and empties into Ilio de los Putos. 

Suisun Oee/i rises in Napa county; flows in a southeasterly direction, 
and empties into the salt marsh about one and a half miles east of 
Bridgeport. 

Green Valler/ Greek- rises in the northwest corner of township 5 JS., 
R. 2 W., and runs a southeasterly course about eight miles, emptying 
into Cordelia slough at Bridgeport. 

Sulphur Sprint/s Yalki/ CreeJe rises near the centre of township 4 
N., R. 3 W., runs a southeasterly course through Sulphur Springs 
valley, and empties into the salt marsh two miles north of the United 
States barracks at Benicia. 

Sulphur Spn'nt/s Greek has its source at the White Sulphur Springs 
three miles northeast from Vallejo; runs a northeasterly coui-se, and 
empties into Napa bay about three miles north of A^allejo. 

SOIL. 

Tho soil is composed principally of decayed vegetation, with here 
and there alluvial deposits. , 

Vegetable growth and roots in a preserved state, resembling peat, 
are frequently found, the principal preservative agent being tannic 
acid. 

This is essentially an agricultural county, and is poor in mineral 
wealth. In 1860, gold in small quantities was discovered on Putah 
creek, and considerable excitement was occasioned thereby, which, how- 
ever, soon subsided. 

Prospecting for coal has developed nothing beyond "iavorable indi- 
cations." 

The quarrying of a very good quality of colored marble has as- 
sumed considerable importance as an industry, while the quarrying of 
basaltic paving-stones near Bridgeport affords employment to a large 
number of men. An excellent quality of building-stone crops out of 
the Blue mountains where the Los Putos breaks through at Devil's 
Gate. 

ABORIGINES, AND EARLY AMERICAN SETTLE- 
MENT. 

The history of early settlements in no part of our country can welt 
omit some account of tho aborigines who, with greater or less reluct- 
ance, gave over their ancient possessions to the adventurous pioneers. 
Prior to the coming of the white settlers, this part of the country 
was occupied by that numerous tribe of Indians called the Snisuues. 
They were perhaps less belligerent than many of the valley tribes, and 
certainly less so than their mountain neighbors. 

No especial encomium could truthfully be passed upon this people as 
they appeared upon the arrival of the American settler. 

In a few years they had slunk away from the presence of a superior 
race, and now live only in the memory of the pioneers. 

Their chief, Solano, — from whom is derived the name of this county, 
— embraced Christianity, receiving a baptismal name in honor of the 
celebrated missionary, Francisco Solano, and was made the recipient 
of the " Suisun Grant," containing seventeen thousand seven hundred 
and fiiVy-two acres. Before receiving this name he was called Soia- 
Ycio, — the fierce of bravo hand. The headquarters of the tribe was 
at Rockville, and their religious capital at Napa, near which latter place 
there was a certaiin stone from which they believed one of their gods 
bad ascended into upper air, leaving tho impress of a foot on the stone. 

General Vallejo saya that in 1817 a military expedition under com- 
mand of Lieutenant Joseii Sanchez crossed the Straits of Carquinca 
on rafts, for the double purpose of exploring the country and reducing 
it to Christianity. 

" On crossing the river they were attacked by tho Suisun tribe, — 
then headed by their chief Malaca, — who caused then) considerable 
loss ; the Indians fought bravely, but were forced to retire to their 



raneheria, where, being hotly puraued, and believing their fittc seated, 
these unfortunate people, incited by their chief, set fire to their oivn 
rush-built huts, and perished in the flames with their families. The 
soldiers endeavored to stay their desperate resolution in order to save 
women and children, but they preferred this doom to that wliioh 
awaited them in the tiands of their enemies," 

The Suisuncs, tike the race everywhere, were extremely superstitious ; 
but they, in common with all races, believed in a great and t)encvolGnt 
spirit, and also a mischief-maker or evil spirit, to whom they attributed 
all their misfortunes. Between the years 183T and 1840 the small- 
pox broke out among the Indians, and in the territory comprised by 
what is now Sonoma, Napa, and Solano counties, sixty thousand are 
wild to liave perished. 

Wittiin a few hundred feet of tho residence of Samuel Martin, near 
Rockville, there was an Indian burial-mound, and over a certain grave, 
in early days, a cross was standing which Ls believed by many to have 
marked the grave of the chief, Solano. In the fall of 1850 the greater 
part of the tribe removed from the Suisun valley to Napa, carrying 
upon their heads one thousand bushels of grain, which had been stored 
at their rancherin, near the burial-mound above mentioned. 

The Woirsktlt family are without doubt Ihe pionceis of Solano 
County. 

William Wolfskill came to California as early as 1828, and settled 
in Los Angeles. In 1843 he obtained of tho Mexican government 
a four-league grant of land on tho Bio de los Putos, and upon this 
gi-ant the first American settlement was made, where tho family of 
AVolfskill still reside. 

Ill 18-12 the Armijo family settled In Suisun valley, followed in tlie 
succeeding year by Vaca and Peiia, who settled in the vicinity of the 
town of Vacaville. These four families, up to 1846, at least, comprised 
the white population of Solano County. 

It may not be amiss to inquire what was tho appearance, what 
were the surroundings, of tho country that in 1846 and 1847 attracted 
settlers hither. 

All the valleys were covered with a most luxuriant growth of wild 
oata, among which fed vast herds of wild cattle, horses, elk and deer, 
while on the hills and in the canons of the mountains the fierce grizzly 
disputed the supremacy of the soil. 

From 184G to 18i30 but few settlers came into the county. Be- 
nicia was the first permanent settlement, although a point at the junc^ 
tion of the Sacramento river and Cache creek — a short distance above 
old Rio Vista — was settled npou by Feltia Miller and J. D. Hoppy, in 
the spring of 1S47, and this settlement was furttier increased in tho 
fall of that year by the arrival of Daniel M. Berry's family. 

In the fall of 1846, John Stilts, passing through the county on his 
way from Feather river to Sonoma, camped for the night on the farm 
of Charies Ramsey, in Green valley. In 1848 he returned to the 
valley to become its first permanent settler, and there he still resides. 
Stilts was followed in a short time by W. P. Durbin and Charles 
Ramsey. 

In the spring of 1848, the family of Daniel M. Berry, consisting of six 
members, removed from Cache creek, and became the firat permanent 
American settlers of Suisun valley. The widow of the pioneer Berry 
still lives upon the site where the first smoke arose from an American 
settler's cabin. Prior to 1850 the increase of population in the valley 
was decidedly slow. Before that date, in addition to those mentioned 
it is remembered that there wo(o here Halt Fine, Joseph Gordon, 
Lnndy Alford, Nathan Barbour, Henry Sweitaer, John M. Perry, 
William Taylor, and William Ledgewood. 

It is to be noted that these parties were in the Suisun valley, and 
do not include tlie settlers at Benicia, who, in 1850, were quite nu- 
merous. 

From the year 1850 onward, immigration to the valley became com- 
paratively rapid, and the poll-list kept at the first general election held 
in the county is given below, as showiug the voting population of 
Suisun valley. The election referred to was held on the second day 
of November, 1852, — the date that closed tho campaign between 
Scott and Pierce. 

There were then but two townships in Solano County, — Benicia 
and Suisun, — and the polling place in the latter town was at the Berry 
ranch. At this election, George A. Gillespie acted as inspector; 
Samuel Martin and Henry K. Curtis, as judges ; John Kelly, Jr., and 
T. J. Mosicr, as clerks. Being the first general election, it is safe to 



10 

assume that the voting population wofl 
at Berry's. These were the ToUire, 
voted: 

Christy Mauka, 
David Smith, 
Ileory B. Clark, 
Tbomaa Gray, 
Dadley C. Uryan, 
Landy AJfurd, 
G. BartOQ, 
Daniel K. Bony, 
Nathan Barhour, 
Jnniea M. Horan, 
Jamca H. Gordon, 
A. W. NortoD, 
P. M. Kirdcndall, 
Tiiomaa C. Maupin, 
G. W. G. Decker, 
Lewis S. Storey, 
Siduey Maupio, 
Henry Suhrader, 
John P. Fiak, 
John Doughty, 
Foster Johnson, 
Henry Swoitser, 
G. W. Sparks, 
Lee F. Owen, 
John Keeney, 
WiLiam Grisson, 
Luke Agar, 
H. J. McCord, 
A. W. Knox, 
William McCord, 
Aaron Lamorer, 
Henry Black, 
John Bell, 
John A. Slorgan, 
nufuB K. EmerBon, 
William S. Gray, 
William B. Bruwn, 
WiUiam H. Beeaon, 
William Ledgewood, 
Isaao Beesom, 
Nathaniel 3IcC. Miuifee, 
Freeman Nye, 
Calvin Littlefield, 
J. Doneanna, 
John W. Owen, 
Clark Stevenson, 
John E. Seaver, 
Philip Palmer, 
James F. C. Brown, 
J, N. Henderson, 
Rohert M. Gillespie, 
H. B. Jewett, 
D. S. Mosier, 
A. J. Van Every, 
T. H. Butler, 
Charles Forbes, 
H. E. Miller, 
J, 6. Norton, 
A. West, 
Jonathan Cook, 
D. M. Berry, 
J. R. Chadborn, 
Sidney Clark, 
William G. Kyle, 
Henry Russell, 
Jos. Blake, 
8. W. Lawson, 
Alex. Blake, 
James 6. Edwards, 
Ihomas M. Alaupin, 
Warren P. Durbin, 
John B. Lemon, 
James M. Lemon, 
William H. Harless, 
Geo. G. Gardner, 
M. A. Martin, 
Geo. K. Mann, 
Dr. James H. Boon, 
Henry D. Lewis, 
Curtis Wilson, 



generally represented that day 
and the order in which ihoy 

Wm. H. Geasnep, 
Thomas H. Owen, 
S. Gregory, 
J. C. Brown, 
A. F. Hudson, 
Henry Hasburg, 
Natli. Barsto, 
A. Jones, 
John M. Perry, 
John Welch, 
Hiram Macey, 
David F. Beveridge, 
Edwin Foigcr, 
J. F. EmcrBon, 
M. R, Cochran, 
Stephen Cooper, 
James Hopkins, 
0. B. Tebbs, 
Cuthburt Burnell, 
Chas. W. Shattuek, 
William 3. Brown, 
Clark Hall; 
Sabina Stiles, 
Anderson Knox, 
B. A. Godfrey, 
James Howlett, 
John Kellcy, Jr., 
P. A. Chalfiu, 
Charles Pratt, 
Samuel Martin, 
Geo. A. Gillespie, 
WiUiam I. Glenn, 
W. H. Wood, 
William Ramsey, 
Harvey James, 
Lcvislon Willis, 
Henry K. Curtis, 
T. J. Mosier, 
J. S. Woudburn, 
Henry Dawson, 
W. H. Carpenter, 
Reuben K. Wiley, 
Harvey J, Mitelicll, 
Hiram Abshicr, 
J. P. McKissik, 
Nathan H. Gregory, 
Sampson Smith, 
B. Frank Woodburn, 
J. R. Green, 
R. Littleton, 
A. R. Edginglon, 
Edwin Forbes, 
Jonathan De Vaull, 
Moses Keys, 
William G. Matthews, 
William H. James, 
John A. Reichai't, 
William Giendenin, 
E. K. Duulap, 
James L. Miles, 
John K, West, 
TJ. P. Dagman, 
Charles White, 
Nathan Cutler, 
John Wagman, 
William Clayton, 
- Thomas Scott, 
Jacob Wildersin, 
William Marr, 
Giles Stettman, 
James Smith, 
Thomas Hallcy, 
C. S. Parker, 
G. E. Hait, 
James Craige, 
M. Brown, 
Lucius Morey, 
William Riley, 
H. F. Connor, 
Charles A. Pcabody. 



of the supreme court, received the highest ''"'"I'" ^^ ^'''^ ^^^' 
e n idate for judge of the seventh judicial distnc^-Thomas J. Bog^ 
mig-eeeived the highest number. Thomas H. Owen, Democrat^ 
Idfdato for the State assembly, received the highest number ; Georg^ 
^vtlcDcm.) received twenty-six votes for county treasurer, a^nst 
^vcTylur Jt for Samuel C Gray (Whig). Daniel K. Berry 
Whig) received one hundred and twenty-five voles for justice of the 
Lc«, against ninety-seven east for W. P- Dagman CDcm.). 
'f" Nonstable of Suisun township, Sampson Smith tDcmO received 
one hundred and ten votes, against ninety-one for Cnrtis Wilson and 
ninety-two for R. M. Gaiespie (Vfht^')- 

The fii^t forming done in the county was conducted upon quito 

^"ihe plows &.^t'used were similar to those with which the Egyptians 
turned the soil in the valley of the Nile three thousand yea.^ ago. Tbc 
pai-t that the steam separator of to-day plays was performed by tlm hoofs 
ofnativehorsestrampingthchar^'cstedgrain. Steam flour, ng-m. lis were 
preceded by hand-mills fastened to some central oak, where the grinder 
llid indeed earn his bread by the sweat of his face. But the means 
of subsistence were not difficult. Game abounded, and the conscience 
of any pioneer permitted him to kill his supply of beef from among 
the bands of wild cattle that thronged the hills, although it was faintly 
surmised that these butchers had an imperfect title to this game. 

MINERAL SPRINGS. 

With the exception of the White Sulphur springs near Vallejo,— 
n.eutlon of which will be made in the sketch of that city, there are 
no mineral springs in Solano County that have attracted sufficient 
attention to render them places of resort. 

Numerous sulphur and soda springs abound, however, and the 
waters of some of the latter are being utilized for commercial purposes. 

LAND TITLES. 

For years following the first settlement of the county a species of 
civil warfare prevailed, growing out of the litigation of land titles. 

By the terms of the treaty of Guadaloupe Hidalgo, the United 
Stat«s governmont was bound to confirm titles to the grantees of 
Spanish and Mexican grants, upon proper showing. 

The boundaries of these grants were not always definite, and the 
title to some of them believed to be imperfect. 

The consequence was that a long war between equattera and pro- 
prietors was waged in court and out of court, causing bitter animosities 
and, not unfrequently, acts of violence and bloodshed. Surveying 
parties were forced to desist from their work ; stakes and land-marks 
were destroyed ; writs of ejectment were numerous, and occasionally 
the officer attempting to serve them was himself ejected not according 
to due process of law. 

The most noted litigation grew out of the Luco and Suscol grants. 
In'the case of the former, after a most vexatious and expensive con- 
test in the courts, the grant was declared invalid, and it became public 
land. The Suscol, an eleven-league grant, was rejected, and a special 
pre-emption act of Congress passed permitting all purchasers under the 
A''allejo title to enter their lands at S1.25 per acre. 

The larger part of the arable land of the county was covered by 
these grants, of which there were six in number — Rancho Rio do los 
Putos, or Wolftkill, Baneho de los Putos, or Vaca and Pena, Tolenas 
or Armijo, Suisun, Suscol, Los Ulpinos, or Eidwell. 



At this election the Democratic presidential electors, Dcmocratio 
candidates for Congress, for judges of the supremo court, and for ulerk 



COMMON SCHOOLS. 

The interest taken in, and provision made for, the public schools do 
credit to the intelligence and public spu-it of the citizens of Solano. 
From the report of the superintendent of schools, given below, will be 
seen the number and character of the pupils in attendance, and the 
approximate yearly amount required to maintain the schools. The 
report referred to is for the school year ending June 30, 1876. 

Number of white children in the county between the ages of 5 and 
17 years,— boys, 2313; girls, 2141; total, 445-1. Number of negro 
children between 5 and 17 years, 23. Number of Indian children 
who live under the guardianship of whito parents, 11. Number of 
children under 5 years of ago, 2134. Number of children between 
5 and 17 years who have attended school at any time during the year, 
3181. Number of children between 5 and 17 who have attended 
private schools but not public schools during the year, 460. 

Number of ehildren who have not attended school at any time dur- 
ing the year, white, 836 ; negro, 4 ; Indian, 6. Number of Mongolian 
ehildren under 17 ycara of age, 44; none attending school. One deaf 
and dumb child, and one blind, Of the nativity of children there 
were, native born of native parents, 2932 ; native horn, one parent 
foreign, 1185 ; native born, both parents foreign, 2043 ; foreign born 
children, 506. 

Tho amount of money expended for school purposes in 1875 was 

866,591.31. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Tho firat experiment in the newspaper publishing business, in Solano 

County, was made at Benieia, in tho month of November, 1855, by 

Messrs. George and Gcllers. 



The paper was called the SoUim County Herald. In 1858 tho 
place of publication was removed to Suisun, and the first number issued 
there was dated the 2d day of October of that year. The managera, 
who at that time were William J. Hooton & Co., announced that their 
office was in the " new building south of the plana.^' In the issue of 
December 17, 1859, 3. G- Lawton, Jr., appears as editor and publisher, 
although prior to that time he had been editor. On the 10th day of 
March, 1860, Powers and Gunnison became the owners, Gunnison oc- 
cupying the editor's chair. Later iu that year, Edward E. Hathaway 
was admitted to the firm, and the name and style became 0- B. Powcra 

&Co. , ■ :, 

In 18G2, H. Hubbard & Co. started the Solano Press, and continued 

the publica'tion until September, 1866, when their interest was pur- 
chased hy George A. Gillespie and Woodford Owens. In tho fall of 

1869 tho PrcsB was consolidated with the Herald, tho consolidation 
resulting in the present Solum Repvhlkan. 

In October, 1875, the paper was purchased by its present proprietors, 
Montgomery and Bowen. 

Tho Solano Count!/ Democrat, Thompson & Linthicum, publishers, 
was established at Suisun on the 30th day of April, 1868. In 

1870 its place of publication was changed to Vallejo. In 1871 it 
was made a daily, hut in the following year it was discontinued. Soon 
after, Linthicum commenced the publication of the DaUi/ Indejpendcni. 
This also, after a short time, was discontinued. 

The first newspaper published in Vallejo was called the Wecht^ 
Bulletin, and was conducted by Cox and Eaton. It was established 
in the latter part of 1355, and continued in existence dx weds. Its 
duration fittingly corresponded with its size, which was about that of 
a sheet of foolscap. 

On the 23d day of February, 1367, the FfiRgo fTeeWy Recorder 
made its appcai-ance, with Poor & Baker, proprietore. On the 20th 
day of June, in the same year, the Daily Recorder was started, with 
-George A. Poor as editor. This was intended as a campaign sheet, 
and, with its mission accomplished, ceased to exist. 

In September, 1868, the Semi- Weekly Recorder was begun, which 
met with a fair degree of success. 

On the 29th day of June, 1867, the Chronicle, of Vallejo, made 
its appearance as an independent journal, with Leach and Gregg pub- 
lishers and proprietors. 

In the month of October, of the same year, the WceMy gave place 
to a daily, and on May 22, 1869, a weekly was again issued in con- 
junction with the daily, and the two, under the management of Frank 
A. Leach, have continued to the present time, meeting with a flattermg 
degree of success. 

In 1875, the Times, daily and weekly, were established at Vallcgo, 
and still continue in a prosperous condition, under the management of 
Messrs. Roe & Walsh. 

In addition to the above Vallejo papers, may he mentioned three 
sheets that appeared at different times, tor special purposes,— The 
Solano County Advertiser, the Open Letter, and the Independent 
Advocate, a campaign sheet, published in 1875. 

The Dixon Tribune made its appearance at Dixon on the 14lh day 
of November, 1874, B. D- Hopkins, editor, and R. D. Hopkins & 
Co,, publishers. ^ 

About one year after it was started, Hopkins became sole proprietor 
and continued its publication until April 1, 1877, when it went under 
the present management of Alfred B. Nye. The Tribune was started 
as a neutral paper in politics. In 1875 it became Democratic. Under 
the management of Jilr. Nye the paper is independent and non-partisan. 
Sizo, 24 hy 36 inches. It is a weekly, and has a circulation of five 
hundred and fifty copies. 

Rio Vista Enterprise.— On the 22d day of September, 1877, the 
Rio Visla Enterprise, a weekly journal devoted to the intcr(sts of Rio 
Vista and its immediate vicinity, made its appearance, with J. A. 
Wliitmorc and W. A. Bushnell, publishers and proprietors. 



CRIMES AND PUNISHMENTS. 
In the history of Solano County there have been hut two executions 
by process of law. Some atrocious crimes have at intervab been com- 
mitted, and the pcrpetnitors have sometimes escaped unwhipped of 

justice. 

Tho firat case of homicide occurred at or near Rockville, where a 
squatter met foul play at tho hands of some Spaniards. But tho first 
to create any considerable excitement was the killing of Jonathan 
Cook, in 1854. Cook, it appears, had missed quite a largo sum of 
money, and had charged one George K. Munn with the iheft. Whether 
true or false, llio charge was indignantly denied by Jlann, and Cook 
was cautioned to desist from repeating the charge. The warning was 
disregarded, and on a certain Sunday afternoon, tho parties meeting 
about two miles from Cordelia, angry words ensued, which were tbUowcd 
by a gunshot from Slanu that instantly killed Cook. 

Tbis occurred iu the presence of a justice of tho peace and others, 
but tho murderer and an accomplice named Siffoixl made their escape, 
and were never afterward heard of. 

Tho code of criminal procedure in the Torritoriid days of the county, 
if not later, must have been largely copied from the code iu force at 



tliu mining camps on tho mouDtaiiis. Aa a sample of the way in 
which iuitice was aflminiBtered in the conntj in 1&49, we take a case 
reported in the court of First Instance for the dixtrict of Sonoma. 
The court was held at Bcniuia, Stephen Cooper, judge, presiding. 

The case is that of " The People of California Territory against 
George Palmer." 

It docs not appear from the records what the offense was, hot the 
defendaiit was found guilty by a jury, and received the following aen- 

tcncc: 

" On Saturday, the 2'Jth day of November, to be conducted by the 
sheriff to some public place and there receive on his bare back seventy- 
live tushes with such weapon as the Bhertir may decni fit, on each count 
(llicrc were two) respectively, and to be banished from the district of 
Sonoma within twelve hours after whipping, under penalty of receiving 
the Hamo number of lashea for each and every day ho remuins in the 
district after the first whipping." 

BENICIA. 

Oil the morning of the 16th day of Juno, IS'IG, a company of 
thirty-three Americans, from Sutter's fort, Napa and Sonoma valleys, 
inarched into the town of Sonoma about daybreak, captured the garri- 
son, and took General Vallejo — commanding-general of the province — 
prisoner. 

These proceedings constituted the beginning of the " Bear Plag 
Muvemcut," which culminated in the cession of California Territory 
to the United States. 

Dr. Kobcrt Scrapie was deputed to convey some of the prisoners 
(among whom were Genornl Vallejo and hie brother Salvador) to Sut^ 
ter's fort, As they were passing up the Stniits of Carquioez in a 
launch, Dr. Scmple noticed that ibo site of what is now Denicia 
afforded excellent opportunities for the building of a town, and that 
project was diacussod between the ciiptivo general, who owned the 
land, and Dr. Scmple. 

As soon as Governor Muson had released General Yallcjo, negotia- 
tions were entered into whereby Dr. Scmple acquired an interest in a 
large tract of land fronting upou the straits, with tho understanding 
that, the foundation of a city was there to be laid. In 1847 Vallejo 
sold his interest to Thomas 0. Larkin, and thereupon the city was 
laid out. The plat is entitled " Plan of Eenicia City, fouuded by K, 
Scmple and T. 0. Larkin, Esqrs., 1847." 

Appended tlicreto b the following : 

" We, the undersigned, do hereby certify tliut the above is a true 
and porfeot copy of the original Plan of Beuicia City, drawn by Jasper 
0. Farrell. 

"Stephen Cooper, 
"Judge of the Court of First Instance. 
" H. R. S. O'Mblteny, 
" E. H. Howe, C. E." 

In 1848 Genernl W. T, Sltermnu visited Bcnicia, and in his " Me- 
moirs" he gives some interesting statements concerning the origin and 
naming of the city. He says : " Wo found a solitary adobe house 
occupied by Mr. Hastings and his family, embracing Dr. Semple, the 
proprietor of the ferry. The ferry was a ship's boat, with a lateen 
sail, which could carry six or eight horses. It took us several days to 
cross over. During the time we got well acquainted with the doctor, 
who was (^uite a cliaructer. He was about seven feet high, and very 
intelligent. Foreseeing, as he thought, a groat city on the bay some- 
where, he selected Carquincz straits as its location, and obtained fiom 
Gcucral Vallejo title to a league of land, on condition of building a 
city to bear the name of General Vallejo's wife: this was Franoisca 
Beniuia. Accordingly, the city wiis first culled Fiancisca. At this 
time, where San Francisco now is was known as Yerba Buena. Now, 
someof the chief men of that place, knowing the importance of a name, 
saw their danger, and so changed tho name to San Francisco. 

" Dr. Scmple was so outraged at their changing the name to one so 
nearly like his town, tliat he, in turn, changed his town's name to the 
other name of Mrs. Vallejo, and Benicia it lias been to this day. That 
Beuicia was the best natural site for a commercial city, I am satisfied, 
and had half the money and half the labor been bestowed upon it that 
has been spent on San Francisco, we should this day have a city of 
palaces on the Carquinez straits." 

Bcnicia is the oldest town in Solano County ; indeed, there was no 
other town upou the Sacramento river at the time of its settlement. 
The site could not fail to strike any observer as favorable to the found- 
ing of a city. It lies on the north side of the straits of Carquincj;, has 
a deep-water frontage for miles, and thousands of acres of undulating 
surface admirably adapted to the building of a beautiful city. 

Sanguine expectations were for a time entertained for the future of 
the city. It was for years the county-seat, and at one time (1854) 
the State capital. In 1849 or 1850 the town wag incorporated as a 
city. 

The city council was composed of six members, and Captain Kar- 
ney was the firat mayor. About that time the United States govern- 
ment located its barracks and arsenal at Bcnicia, and about 1853 the 
lacific mail steamship company came aud located their extensive 
works. 



The first government officer in command was Major Allen. The 
present commanding officer is Colonel Julian MeAllLster. During all 
these eorly years business was prosperous, the town improving, aud tho 
populatiop. rapidly increasing. 

The first misfortune befell the city in 1854, when the Slate capital 
was removed to Sacramento. The town had erected at its own expense 
a substantial building for a State-house— a building in everj- way 
adequate to the requirements of the new Sute. 

After one year's occupation by the Slate government it was left 
deserted, hut at present possibly does the State better service by being 
used as the public-school building. 

The contest over the question of removal was a bitter one. The 
bill effecting ilmt end was pa,^cd at three o'clock in the morning, tho 
governor sitting up to sign, for fear of a reconsideration. 

The second misfortune was the removal of the eounty-seat to Fair- 
field in 1858 ; and the next occurrence tending directly to tho dis- 
advantage of Benicia was the removal of the Pacific mail company's 
works to San Francisco. "Willi the lines of railroad surrounding tho 
city, hut not coming within its reach, and with the drawbacks above 
mentioned, the growth and prosperity of Benicia were materially 
checked. 

In ono respect, however, it attained a point of cscalleuce equaled 
by few places in tho State — in that of educational institutions. 

The first building believed to have been erected in Bcnicia was an 
adobe. It was built by William I. Tustin, and is still standing. 

Major Stephen Cooper kept tho first hotel. Major Cooper was also 
alcalde and judge of the court of Firat Instance for tho disLrict of 
Sonoma. 

Bcnicia has been the residenceof quite a number of men prominent 
in local and State politics. 

Its founder, Dr. Robert Scmple, was president of the convention 
that framed the State constitution. 

The military establishments in the city have at different times been 
the headquarters of the most distinguished of American generals, 
while the schools have attracted people of learning ond refinement. 

For the truth of history it must be recorded that for years this was 
the home of one who acquired a world-wide — though unenviable — 
reputation, John C. Heenan, the Benicia boy. 

A few of the pioneers who came to Benicia at or shortly after its 
first settlement are still living here, among whom are E. H. Van Phis- 
ter and Hon. L. B. Misner. Andrew Goodyear, who came in 1350, 
still lives a few miles from town. 

This is the home of the venerable Captain John Walsh, wbo sailed 
into San Franoiaoo bay in the year 1818. 

ST. CATHERINE'S ACADEMY. 

This institution is under the auspices of the Sisters of Saint Dom- 
iuic, an order founded in the thirteenth century. 

The academy was established on the Pacific coast in 1850. The 
building first occupied in Benicia was one rented of Dr. Semple. At 
that time three sisters only conducted it. Now about thirty employ 
their time in its various departmenta, and the school has an average 
attendance of about one hundred and fifty pupils. 

The building is delightfully located, and is in itself a commodious 
and substantial structure, as may be seen from the lithographio view 
in this volume. 

The doors of this institution ore open to respectable young ladies of 
every religious creed who desire the acquirement of a refined and 
solid education. 

The coui-sc of instruction embraces the English, French, Spanish, 
and Latin languages, Rhetoric, Elocution, Composition, Ancient and 
Modern History, Biogi'aphy, Mythology, Arithmetic, Algebra, Geome- 
try, Book-keeping, Botany, Natural Philosophy, Chemistry, Geography, 
Astronomy and Use of Globes, Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, 
Writing, Drawing, Painting, Tapestry, Plain and Ornamental Needle- 
work, etc. 

The academic year consists of one term, commencing August 16, 
and closing about the middle of June. 

COLLEGE OF ST. AUGUSTINE. 

This, and " St. Mary of the Pacific," are the diocesan schools of 
the northern diocese of the Episcopal Cliureh in California, and are 
under the immediote supervision of Bishop Wingfield. The late 
Bishop Breek devoted much time and effort in perfecting the workings 
of these church schools, which have now attained a worthy reputation 
throughout the State. 

The college of St. Augustine was founded in 1867, and incorporated 
according to the laws of California, May 14, 1868. The location of 
the college is unsurpassed for health and beauty. The buildings 
occupy an elevated site and command an extenaivo view of the straits 
of Carquinez and the beautiful hills beyond, with Mount Diablo on 
the left, and San Pablo bay on the right. 

The grounds of the college comprise sixty acres about one mile back 
from the open bay, and a portion of them arc tastefully laid out 
and decorated with flowers, ornamental trees, and shrubbery. Tho 



11 

buildings ore commodious and inviting, imd were built for the par- 
poses to which ihcy are dovoted. 

Of late years, the idea of aflbrding eicrcise to and obtaining obedi- 
ence from pupils by means of military drill and discipline lias become 
a favorite one. These means arc hero employed, the spacious grounds 
being well adapted to the rei[uiremcnl8 of a militar}- school. 

The surest test of the training a boy has received at school is 
made when he applies for admission to the universities. It is to the 
credit of St. Augustine college that its young men have uniformly 
stood well at the university. 

In the work of instruction the rector is aided by a corps of expe- 
rienced and competent professors and teachers, who devote their time 
exclusively to the business of the eollego. 

ST. MARY OP THE PACIFIC, 

This institution of learning was founded in 1870 by tho late Rev, 
J. Lloyd Brcck, D.D., and was designed to be the church tmining- 
school for the daughters of tho Pacific coast. Its systoms were 
modeled after those of "St. Mary's Hall," Minnesota, the church 
school of Bishop Whipple, which has attained throughout tho cast an 
excellent reputation for usefulness and efficiency. St, Mnry of the 
Pacific is in charge of Bishop Wingfield, assisted by a corps of com- 
petent and experienced teachers. 

A vast amount of money has been expended in putting this school 
upon its present fooling. A better location for a female school could 
not have been found. The mountain and water scenery is unsurpassed 
for beauty and attractiveuess, 

'The building itself is perhaps the most prominent one in Bcnicia, 
and, by its internal arrangements, every requirement of health, cupofort, 
and convenience is satisfied. 

The physical eare of the young ladies stands prominent as a feature 
of the school, never to be sacrificed from ambitious motives to excel. 

The full course of instruction embraces seven years, and is designed 
to be as thorough as that of the best female seminaries in the east. 

BEMICIA YOUNG LADIES' SEMINARY. 
This institution ranks among the very oldest educational institutions 
of California. It was founded by Miss Atkins, from the high-school 
in Columbus, Ohio. Miss Mary E. Snell is principal. This seminary 
has long maintained a high reputation as a school of thorough mental 
training ; while it is wholly free from Bcetarian bias, there is unre- 
mitting attention to the moral training of the pupils, on a platform 
common to all Christian teachers. 

ST. DOillNIC'S MISSIONARY COLLEGE 
(Catholic) was founded by Rev. S. Vilarraaa at Monterey, in 1852, 
but was removed to Benicia in 1854. Its object is to prepare young 
men for missionary life. 

CORDELIA. 

Next to Benicia this is the oldest town of the county. It was 
originally situated in Green valley, about one-half mile north of the 
present towu of Bridgeport, on the old stage road between Beuieia 
and Sacramento. 

As early as 1853 there was a post-office located here, which was 
afterwards removed to Rockvillc, and thence to Bridgeport. Tho place, 
that now exists only in the memory of the older settlers, has witnessed 
the sittings of several of the earlier county conventions. Cordelia, 
upon the passage of the railroad in 1868, was absorbed by 

BRIDGEPORT, 

a station of the California Pacific railroad, fifteen miles distant from 
Vallejo. It is situated upon a navigable slough of Suisun bay, at the 
entrance to Green valley. It has a church, school, railroad depot, 
hotel, box-factory, wagon-shop, blacksmith-, butcher-, shoemaker-, and 
harness-shops. Tho village ia in a prosperous and growing condition. 
Present population, about two hundred. 

ROCKVILLE 

lies on the old stage road, about five miles west from Fairfield. A 
stone church building, a school-house, and blacksmith -shop, with a few 
scattered dwellings, make up the present town. 

Before the railroad entered the valley Rockville had less the appear- 
ance of a " deserted village." It formerly had a post-office, hotel, and 
store. 

Here was a rancheria of the Suisunes and the headquarters of the 
chief, Solano. Here, too, the music of the anvil was first heard in 
the valley, and John JI. Perry produced a rude kind of plow at the 
moderate price of sixty-five dollars. 

FAIRFIELD. 

This is the county-seat of Solano County. Tlie name was given 
the place by Captain R. H. Waterman, in honor of his native town, 
Fairfield, Gonncctiout. It is situated north of and adjoining tho city 
of Suisun. 

The town site, at tho time it was platted, was the property of B. H. 
Waterman and A. E. Richie. The plat was filed for record May 16, 
1859. 



12 

In 1858 an election was held ia the couDty for the purpose of 
deciding whether the conntyseat should he removed from BeT.icm, 
where it then was. Out of seventeen hundred and thirty votes cob , 
ten hundred and twenty-nino were in favor of removal to Fairfield, 
and on the 14th day of September, 1858, the board of superviBora 
made an official announcement of the result of the election. 

The tow,, is favorably located, not only for the convon.encc of the 
citizens of the county having business at the county-scat, hut in a 
eommercial sense as well. To the west of the town are some of the 
very best agricultural lands of the valley. The present poputaUon is 
about two hundred. , 

In addition to tho county buildings, there are liere an excellent 
Kradcd school, Methodist church, and a church of the Second Advcn- 
tists in process of construction. There arc two hotels, a l.very stable, 
and hlaukBmith-shop. 

About three miles northeast from Fairfield is located the county 
infirmary, which was erected in 1876. This institution is conducted 
in a creditable manner, and reflects honor upon tho humanitarian 
feelings of the people of this county. Connected with the infirmaty 
are aixty aorea of land. 

VACAVILLE. 
The plat of this town was filed for record December 13, 1851, and 
h entitled as follows : " Mapa de la villa a Vacaville, Estado de Cali- 
fornia, Fundallo per Guillermo McDnnicI y Lino B. Miznor." The 
pint of Benicia is tho only one in the county that antedates it. The 
town and the valley in which it lies take tlieir name from Vaca, a 
native of Santa F6, New Slexico, who, with Peiia, came into Lagoon 
valley in 1S43. They obtained a grant of forty-four thousand three 
hundred and eighty acres, called Rancho los Putos. 

Contained within this grant are lands that for agricultural purposes 
are une-tcelled by any on the Pacific coast. 

The yield and the quantity of the early fruits grovm in Taca and 
Pleasants' valleys arc matt^ra of notoriety throughout the State. 

Owing to these facts, the settlers in these valleys have, in many 
eases, attained to an enviable competency, and the scores of well-kept 
orchards and vineyards that surround comfortable homes attest the 
general prosperity. 

Although the plat of Vacaville hears the file mark of December 13, 
1S51, it will he seen from what follows that the laying out of avenues 
and streets, and designating tbem by names, was not absolutely neces- 
sary for the convenience of the citizens of " Villa de Vacaville" at 
that period. 

Henry B. Ammons, Esq., who looated in Vaca valley in the fall of 
1851, remcmbera that at the time of his settlement one building only 
constituted the entbe public and private structures of the town. "Wil- 
liam MoDaoie! was the owner of the building in question. The second 
one oreoted was a rude kiud of hotel, kept by one WcGuire. 

In the fall of 1854 the town began to assume some importance, 
and at this date Mr. E. F. Gillespie opened a general merchandising 
store near the site of the present Wilson House. His was the first 
store opened in Vacaville. 

Prior to 1850 tho whole valley surrounding Vacaville was a range 
for the cattle of Vaca and Peiia. 

Among the first to settle in this part of the county were Evan 
Dollerhide and three eons, the two Stevensons, the Long brotliere (a 
numerous family, part of which crossed the plains in 1846), and 
Bichardson and S. W. Long, cousins of the Long brothera above 
mentioned. 

James M. Pleasants, in 1851, settled in the beautiful valley that 

bears his name. He was followed by M. B. Miller and E. E. Therber. 

The first occupation afforded the settlere of the country around 

Vacaville was the cutting of the rank wild oats, and transporting the 

same to points upon the Sacramento river. 

The site of Vacaville was well chosen. Tlie Ulattis creek, which 
runs through it, is never entirely dry, and wliat is more singular is the 
fact that the volume of water in the stream at Vacaville increases 
year by year. The acencry, the climate, the church and educational 
advantages pertaining to Vacaville, render it a most desirable place of 
residence. In 1860 the Vaca Valley railroad entered the town. The 
projectors of this enterprise wore A. M. and G. B. Stevenson, Theodore 
and Joshua Donaldson, and Mr. Mansfield. 

On the 4ih day of June, 1877, an extensive fire occurred, which 
destroyed nearly one-half of the town. The damage, however, is only 
temporary, as buildings of a better character are being constructed 
in place of those destroyed. 

Besides tho public school, Vacaville has a collegiate institution that 
affords opportunities for prosecutiug a complete coutso of clnaaicll and 
scientific studies. This institution is known as California College. It 
IB under the auspices of the Baptists, 

The religious denominations represented in this town are tho Pres- 
byterians, Baptists, and Christians. 

The roll of business places includes one first-class hotel (tho Wilson 
Housed, three general mcrcliandising-storcs, two drug-stores, two 
blackHmith-sliops, grain warohouacs, railroad, express, and telegraph 
offices. The population is about 400. 



ELM IRA. 
The namesake of this town is the city of Elmira, New Tork^ The 
place is also known as Vaea station, it being the junct.c^^ of the Cab 
Lnia Pacific and Vaca Valley, and Clear Lake railroads. 
T"; located on the southwest quarter of section 10, township 6 B. 
1 and the plat was filed for rewrd October 20, 1868. 

From the above date it will be seen that the parage of tho rai road 

JZ to the town. The plat comprises about •*-ty_aere« -d w. 

L property of Stephen Hoyt, who laid out the town -n 1868. T^ 

ettlement of the country surrounding Elm. ra was begun in 185^. 

st Jh t, Charles Pearson, and Jedcdial. Williams were set Ic.. 

at 5 at peri d. In 1854, Ha.cn Hoyt and Allen Van Fleet sett d 

1 the present town site, and Wellington Boone and J-- ^o-e 

became settlers on what is known as the Hawkins' Place. Thefi^t 

is of barley were raised in 1853. by Stephen Hoyt -'^ A'len V " 

Fleet. Sacramento, at the time, was the pnnc.pal market for the 

products of this part of the valley. f „ „„j 

In 1854, Hazcn Hoyt marketed there the first lot of hogs fattened 

in this vicinity, for which he obtained eight cents per pound. 

Elmira is distant ten miles in a northeasterly direction from the 
county-scat, Population, about 500. _ 

Church and school interests arc represented in a manner mdicabng 
thrifty and enterprising citizens. 

There are two stores doing a general merchandise business two 
hotels, two warehouses, a lumber-yard, livery-stable, and three black- 
smitb-shops. Good water is supplied from wells. 

DIXON. 
This thriving village lays no claims to antiquity, having sprang into 
existence upon the passage of the California Pacific, in 1868. But 
with its rise dates the decline of the old town Silvcyville, which was 
absorbed by its younger and more favored rival, Dixon. In this con- 
nection, therefore, we give a brief sketch of SilveyvUle as it w.is. 

The place took its name from Elijah S. Silvey, who, in 1852, settled 
there It was Silvey's intention to locate midway between Vacaville 
and Putah creek, and thereby be enabled to keep, for the accommoda- 
tion of the traveling public, a "half-way house." The question would 
naturally be suggested, what was the object of a half-way house, or 
any other public-house situated amid wild oals upon the open pniiric? 
But the establishment was not without patronage from the first. In 
addition to the hotel, Silvey kept a corral for stock, and old settlers 
remember the red lantern hung by night upon a flag-staff to indicate 
to belated travelers the place of rendezvous. 

On Christmas day, 1856, George A. Gillespie commenced the con- 
struction of a store, which was the second building erected in Silvcy- 
ville. 

In 1857, Simmons and Long,— to supply a supposed necessity of the 
town,— constructed tho third building and occupied it as a saloon. 

Prior to the building of the railroad, Silvcyville had attained eon- 
sidemblc importance as a trading point To-day not much remains of 
what the town once was. The old hotel still stands, but the changes 
of twenty-fivo years have rendered the hanging out of the red lantern 
by night no longer necessary. 

Among the eariier settlci-s in the country surrounding SilveyvUle, 
were Hardin Reddick, Newton C- Peters, and James Sweeney. 

Sixim takes its name from Thomas Dickson, who donated the rail- 
road company ten acres of land for depot and other purposes. 

It lies on the California Pacific railroad, forty miles in a northeasterly 
direction from Vullejo. Unlike too many California towns, Dixon 
does not show evidence of having "seen better days." 

From the first it has steadily and continuously grown, and, while 
younger than most of tho towns of Solano County, it ranks next to 
Vallejo in business and population, and second to none in general 
prosperity. This fovorable condition of things is attributable to tho 
energetic men who have had interests at stake in the town, and to the 
wide reach of mognifieent farming lands that surround it. For grain- 
producing purposes, a large part of the land in Silvcyville township 
(in which Dixon is situated) is unexcelled. 

Before the completion of the Vaca Valley railroad as high as 25,000 
tons of grain have been received at Dixon in a single year. On the 
7tli day of July, 1868, the fii-st goods were offered for sale by W. K. 
Ferguson, who in 1853 had settled at Maine Prairie, fi-om whence he 
removed to Di.ion. Mr. Ferguson also built the first dwelling-house 
in the town. In the mercantile line, Eppingor, and Blum, Sons & Co., 
followed Mr. Ferguson. Although containing a population of about 
twelve hundred, Dixon has never been incorporated. 

From tho following list of business and other interests may bo in- 
ferred the condition of the town,— especially when it is claimed that 
business here has never been overdono. 

Bank of Di son, established in 1874, capital stock, §500,000; J. 
C. Morrificld president, and A. J. Kastcn, cashier. A weekly news- 
paper, and job, printing office, 7 hotels and 2 livery stables, 4 general 
merchandise stoves, 2 grocery-stores, 2 dmg-storcs, 2 jewolry-storcs, 2 
millinery-stores, 2 butclior-shops, 3 blauksniith-shops, 2 barber-shops, 1 
tailor-shop, 1 brewery, 1 flouring-mill, 1 pluning-inill, 1 wagon and plow 






manufactory, 1 cabinet maker's shop, 1 lumber-yard, and 4 gnin 
warehouses, with a total capacity of 10,000 tons. 

There arc resident here as professional men, 1 editor, 2 lawyers, 3 
physicians, and 1 dentist. Six religious denominations are represenled, 
the Baptist, Methodist, Gorman Lutheran, Boman Catholic, Cocgre- . 
gational, and Seventh Day Adventists. Five of these organimiont - 
liavo church edifices. There is a public graded school, employing 
four teachers, and having about two hundred pupils in attendance. 

The secret and benevolent societies arc well represented, and all an 
in a prosperous condition, 

RIO VISTA. 
In the full of 1857, Colonel N. H. Davis, an enterprising rancher, 
living on the upper end of the Ulpinoa or Bidwcll grant, near tlie 
junction of Cache slough and the Sacramento river, surveyed a tenn- 
plat on his ranch. This plat was duly recorded. 

The site of the town was one mile below the mouth of Cacbo 
alou-^h. He called tho town Brazos del Kio (arms of the river), » 
very appropriate name, as it lay near the junction of three arms or 
branches of the Sacramento river. Three years later the nainewu 
changed to Eio Vista (river view), a name also vcrj- appropriate, as the 
town site was nearly opposite one of the three branches of the river, 
thus affording truly a splendid Rio Vifta. 

At the time of the survey, Colonel Davis' residence was the only 
bouse upon the site. The first building upon the plat after the surret 
was a store building moved from Sidwell's landing on Grand ialacd, 
and was occupied by A. G. Westgate for mercantile purposes. 

This building stood on the corner of Main and Front streeti. 
This was followed in rapid succession by a butcher-shop by A. J. 
Bryant, a hotel by Freeman Brothers (James and Thomiis), ahotd 
by W. K, Squires, a blacksmith-shop by Simon Fallman, a tin-shop 
by Carter & Son (Bobert and Eobert C), a store by S. K. Peny,» 
dru"-store by Freeman Brothers, a drug-store by C. A. Kirkpalrick, i 
livery-stable by James Hammell, and several private residences, making 
in all quite a httle village. In the spring of 1858, Colonel Daris 
constructed a wharf 24 X^o feet, which answered all demands at tbt 
time. John Sidwell was the builder. 

In 1859 the Steam Navigation Co. came into possession of the wbaif, 
and, to accommodate their large steamers, the wharf was enlar^t-d 
to48XlyfJ feet. The lai^e and magnificent steamers, New WorlJ, 
Eclipse, Antelope, and Senator were then plying between San Fran 
Cisco and Sacramento. Colonel Davis early established a post-office in 
the town, and that made it a kiud of headquarters for all the surronnd- 
inrr country, as there was no other office within twenty miles of the 
place. At this time there was a great abundance of salmon in the 
Sacramento river, and hundreds of men were engaged in fishing. As 
there was no other boat-landing between Sacramento and Bcmcii, 
there were thousands of fish shipped from this point daily. Evetj- 
thing was prosperous and in a flourishing condition in the new tomi 
for five years, when a circumstance occurred which was destined lo 
sweep the town out of existence at one fell swoop. In the fall uf 
1801 it began raining some time before Christmas, and continued 
almost incessantly for the Ir.iditional forty days and forty nights. 

The water in the S.icramento rose to unheard-of heights. Dunng 
the last days of December, in 1861, the water rose high enough lo 
sweep away all the smaller houses in the town, hut it was reserved for 
the 9lh day of January, 1S62, to witness the culmination of the 
fearful catastrophe whereby a whole village was to be swept out of 
existence, its people escaping with barely their lives. 

On that day the water stood ten feet deep at the foot of Mam 
street, and very nearly that deep all over the town and surrounding 
country. For miles in all directions the whole face of the countrj- «^ 
covered with a wild waste of waters. A terrible rain-storm prevailed 
all day, with a gale blowing from the east. The waves ran high, and. 
beating against the houses, made total wreck of all long before night, 
leaving the people to get to the high lands or other places of safetj 
as best they could. 

They all collected together on the top of a mound not far distant 
from tho site of the lately thriving village. They brought a few 
things with them, and managed to eke out a few days of the mosl 
miserable existence until a steamer ciuue and took them off. 

Those days and nights of misery and privation are perhaps among 
the hardest tho early pionecre were called upon to undergo. All ihnl 
now remains to mark the site of the old towu are a few fast decaying 
piles that formed a part of the wharf 

A few strangers sleep in unkuown graves near there; cattlo and 
horses now graze undisturbed where was once the busy mart of trade. 
Shortly after this, perhaps in tho month of March, 1S62, sevi-ial of 
tlie former residents of Rio Vista be^Tin casting about for a mort 
secure place whereon to pitch their tents, » location abovo tho rearh 
of the raging flood. 

The upper edge of tho Montezuma hills, at the northeast corner ol 
Mr. Joseph Bruning's ranch, presented the most favorable appearauW. 
aud ncgotintiouB were at oiico entered into with Mr. Bruniiij; for tho 
catablishmont of tho town on ila present site. Act-ordingly, ^"■ 
Bruuing surveyed and recorded tho town-plat of " Now Bio Viata m 



18G2. Mr. T. J. SlcWorthj owned a. ranch adjoining Mr. Bnining 
on the ujjper side, and lie also Burvejed and recorded an addition to 
thr- totrii. Main street was estobliihed on the line of division between 
the twc ranches, and tlie town has grown up on eitlicr side of Main 
dlreel. In the first place, aa an inducement to settle the town on its 
present site, Mr. Bruning Rnve a certain amount of land to the first 
sclllere, and they gave, in return, bonds that they would settle, and do 
)iij>tine)S at that point. 

TIjc first store was erected by 8. K. Perry. This was followed by 
a hotiJ by John Sidwell, a IioUjI by W. K. Squires, and many other 
business and private buildings. Many of the.pDOple who were former 
residcnls of the old town came down and went on with their fonner 
occupaliopiB as though no flood bad ever occurred. The new town 
grew Ripidly, and in a short time far cjrcellcd the old. The post-office 
ffa.* eslablrshcd at the Store of S. K. Perry, — Mr. Perry beiu" post- 
iDBBtcr at the old town when it was deatroycd. 

The wharf was built, by Mr. Joseph Bruning in the spring of 1862. 
It was afterward.s purchased by the Steam Navigation Co.rand ie at 
present owned by the California Paoific R. R. Co. In' 18G6 the 
steamer Yoacmile blew up at this wharf, killing about eighty people. 
Of this number, thirty-five were Cbinamon. 

The Catholic church was the first church edifice built in town, and 
wuH erected in 18(18. The only other church hero at present L the 
Congregational ; this was creeled in August, 1808. The first public 
whiiul in the new town was established in the fall of 1862; Janiea M. 
CInisc was the firet teacher. Mr. Bruning gave the property on which 
the building was crceleiJ. The present edifice wag erected in 1875 at 
nn expcase of $6300. When the census for 1876 was taken, there 
were 270 children in the district under seventeen yeara of age.' The 
present silo of Kio Vista is sixty-four miles from San Francisco, and 
fifty miles from Sacramento. It is twenty-two miles from Fairfield, 
the counly-aeat. It liea on tho western bank of the Sacramento river^ 
and in the aistern part of Solano County, 

Rio Vista is in the heart of one of tho most prosperous agricultural 
districts in the Slate of California. The famous graio-produeiog 
MoMlezuma hilts lie at its back, and they are unrivaled for grain. In 
front of it lies a vast body of reclaimed swamp and overflowed land, 
exicnding far away to Stockton. These lands are an incxhauBtibie 
source of fruit, vegetables, and grain. 

There arc two lines of steamers that land here daily,— one of each 
line going each way. The line owned by the California Pacific Rail- 
road Company plies between San Francisco and Sacramento. These 
Bleaniors carry tho United Stalesmail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. 
A mail arrives and departs eaeh way daily. The other line runs in the 
river trade, carrying fruit, vegetables, and other products of the 
islands to market. These Bteamere belong to the California Traospor- 
tation Co. 

Kio Vista is the present terminus of the Montezuma Telegraph 
Company. Two-fifttis of the stock of this company is owned by 
citiEena of Bio Viata. 

At present the population ib about six hundred, and ia rapidly 
increasing, new buildings being in course of construction continually. 
Ihe town is supplied irith water from the Sacramento river. 

It is lifted by Bteam and forced into large tanks, situated on an 
emmonce near the centre of the town. From thence it is distributed 
throughout tho town by means of maina aud pipes, of which there 
are nearly eight miles. 

The manager of this enterprise b an old settler of the town,— K. C. 
Carter. An abundance of good water may also be had by boring. 

The great amount of grain and hay grown in the vicinity of llio 
Vista demand warehouses with lui-e storage capacity. In the town 
there are three warehouses, with room to store six thousand tons of 
grain and six thousand five hundred tons of hay. At New Town 
landing, about one mile above Kio Vista, Johnson & Emigh have two 
very liii;ge warehouses, with a storage capacity of four thousand tons 
"I gram and three thousand five hundred tons of hay, making in all 
'I storage capacity of ten thousand tons of grain and tho same number 
" r^l^' ^'''*^'' '^ "'■■"■'"'''e for the adjacent ranchers. 

There are here three hotels, one restaurant, seven general merchau- 
"Jisc stores, one news- and notion-store, two drug-stores, one fruit- and 
vegetable-store; one millinery-store, one furniture-Store, one tailoring 
eslabhahment, three Bhoemukcrs, two wagon- and blacksmith-shops, 
two barber-shops, one tinner, two saddlers, one livery-stable, one flour- 
""", one planing-mill, one undertaker, one public hall, two churches, 
one academy, and a graded public school, employing two tcachera. 

Ihe greater part of Kio Vista townahip is comprised in what is 
known as the Ulpinos or Bidwell grant. This grant begins at tho 
mouth of Cache slough, on the west bank of tho Sacramento river, 
and extends four leagues down the river and one league back, contain- 
ing seventeen thousand seven liuudred and twenty-six acres of as good 
pain-producing land as there is in the State. The grant was made 

<jcncnil John Bidwell by the Mexican government in 184'1 for 
'"Uilaty serviirca rendered. 

general Bidwell disposed of it by fractiona without eivinE any 
definite boundaries. . b b J 

At length things were in a great muddle, and in 1858 a government 



! r8;7tir«;:"'^ "- "".t'- '^^ "--•^^O-'lUput^. in August. 
i«bb,tlieseulei^ Tx^ivod thcr patents. The title to land in tbii 
I gran is considered among the clearest of any in ihe State. 

airdne^ Joseph Brun.n,, H. H. Toland, and .M. MaryLaph. 

tha?r T TnZ"^ '" "''' ^"'"^^ '"'^^ => ^'^'""<=" ' 'o the effect 
ha Genend M. Q Vallejo had, at one time, been able to sail in a 

ae^ rh^f'"'"" '^™°' ""^P"*"^"' ''"" "f Sacramento to Benicia 
aci^ the high country where now are rich farms and thrifty settle- 
« Desiring to find the truth of the matter, the liberty was taken 

follots''^"'^ ^°""'' '" '"^"^ ^ '^^ "'"'■^^- ^-^ "P"'''^ '^ 

"December 12, 1842, the whole country was overflowed, and all 
that level part of your country out to the hills at Vaeaville. On that 
day I sailed in a schooner of twenty tons from the present site of 
Sacramento in a southwesterly direction, passing over what is now 
elevated farming lands in that section. The Montezuma hills and 
Other highlanda were not submerged, but all the other country was 
I was able to, and did, sail over with case where are now fine farms. 
bevcrai hunters and their horses wore drowned, and afterwards found 
at Benicia when the waters subsided. The overflow Insted for several 
weeka. No crops were then raised, as there were no settlers in the 
whole region at that date, only a few cattle-hcrdera and liunterg." 

By the above it will be seen that the high water of 1862 was not 
the highest ever known, as is generally supposed by the old settlers 
here, especially those who experienced that flood. 

ST. GERTRUDE'S ACADEMY, llIO VISTA. 

This estabiiabniont is under the direction of the Sisteta of Mercy, 
and was founded aud erected by Joseph Bruning, EBq.,_the founder 
of New Kio Vista,— in 1876. The academy is most pleasantly located 
for a boarding school, occupying, as it does, one of the handsomest sites 
to be found. 

From the academy there ia a fine view of the town and surrounding 
country, also of the Sacramento river for miles above and below the 
town. The climate in this part of the country is remarkably healthy, 
the air being pure and entirely free from the malaria common to other 
districts along the river. The academy is an entirely new building, 
finely finished and furnished throughout, the musical instruments, ete., 
being of the best make, 

Tho school-rooms arc fiirnished in the latest and best style. The 
grounds are handsomely laid out, and ornamented with flowera, abruba, 
and trees. 

This institution embraces a hoarding school for young ladies and 
day academy for girls and small boys. In these schools are taught all 
the branches of a solid education, and any extras that may be required. 

These schools have been but a short time in operation, but are 
already in a fiourisbing condition, with eveij prospect of a continuance 
of the same. The scholastic year is divided info two sessions of five 
months each. M. M. Camillus, Lady Superior. 

COLLINSVILLE. 

In the year 1846, a man by the name of L. W. Hastings— a Mormon 
— built the first house, an adobe, in Collinsville township. 

It is not known what intentions the builder of this house had, 
whether simply to build a dwelling and take possession of the rich 
tract of land adjacent, or to found a town. Bayard Taylor mentions 
the house in his California travels, and says that it was the intention' 
of Hastings to build a town at this point, and call it Montezuma City. 
Whatever may have been his intentions, it is certain that the enterprise 
never progressed further tlmn the building of the adobe. 

The first permanent settler in Montezuma township— as it was then 
called — was L. P. Marehall. In 1852 he moved into the adobe built 
by Hastings, and called the Montezuma House, and lived there con- 
tinuously for a quarter of a century. In 1859, Mr, C. J. Collins 
entered the land where Collinaville now stands. It was government 
land, as was the whole of the township. In 1861 ho surveyed tho 
tewn piat and built a wharf and store. lu 1861, George W. Miller 
was appointed the first postmaster of the tewn. In 1867, Mr. Collins 
sold the property to S. C. Bradahaw, and Mr. Bradshaw changed the 
name to New Port. Many of the older settlors remember New Port 
and the enterprise of its proprietor, in the disposition of tewn lots, 
and perhaps some of the people of the east have occasion to rcmomber 
it also. Town lots were sold by agents in the east covering all the 
tide land in that vicinity. 

At the end of about five years the property again changed hands, 
}i1t. E. I. Uphnm becoming purchaser. Mr. Uph am 'changed the 
name to the original. 

There are hero two stores, one hotel, and two wharves. The prin- 
cipal industry of the place at present is salmon canning. 

This enterprise was entered upon some years ago by Booth, of oyster 
notoriety, but for some reason did not prove a success, and was finally 
abandoned. 

It has lately been revived by Corvillo & Co., of San Francisco. 
During tho height of the season they mo the cannery day and night, 
Sundays included, turning out daily about 20,000 cans. One hundred 



13 

and eighty men arc employed at the eslahlishment,— one hundred of 
which am Chinamen,- and employment is afforded one hundred more 
m catching fish. Two steamers land daily, going each way. 

MAINE PRAIRIE. 
Maine Prairie is a shipping and trading point, situated at the he.id 
of navigation on Cache slough,— one of the many sloughs which put 
out from the Sacramento river. It Hcs eighteen miles northeast of iho 
county-seat. In early days it was simply an cmbarcadero. In 1859, 
Captain Mcrrithcw, in company with J. N. Utter, settled on tho south 
bank of the slough and opened a general merchandise, grain, and 
lumber business. The following year, H. G. Deck, H. Wilcox, and 
W. D. Vail formed a copiirtncraliip known as Deck &. Co., and began 
a general merchandising business on the north side of tho. fllough, 
opposite Mcrrithcw Sc Co. 

In 1860 a hotel was built by George King, and ottior bousea rapidly 
followed, until quite a little village was built up. But tho flood of 
1862 swept things hero a« at Kio Vista and other river towns. Not 
a vestige was left where once stood the town. The water stood about 
twclce feet deep in the streets, and fully that deep for milra in every 
direction. As soon as the water had subsided, most of the inhabitants 
came b.ick again, but while some rebuilt at the old site, others preferred 
to go further up the slough, where the land was more elevated. Ac- 
cordingly, Mrs. Kcbecca Lcms laid out a town plat on her land, about 
one-fourth of a mile above the site of Maine Prairie. 

This embryotic town received the name Alton, being named by S. 
R. Perry, an old resident of Alton, Illinois. 

The firat business in this tewn was conducted by (Pushing Bros. 
(C. S. and J. H.). They carried on a general merchandise busincBs. 
Perry & Co. came nest. This firm consisted of S. R. Perry and 
William C. Palmer. They opened a general line of goods and also 
dealt in grain. Mrs. Lewis opened a hotel about that time, and con- 
tinues to conduct the same to this day. 

The post-office was established in 1862, Captain J. C. Mcrrithcw 
being appointed postmaster. A branch office of the Western Union 
Telegraph Co. was esteblished there in 1870, but has since been dis- 
continued. Before tho days of railroads, Maine Prairie w.is ouo of 
the most important grain-shipping points in the State of California. 
It was second to none except Steckton. Grain was drawn in there 
for abipment with great teams and enormous wagona. One day in 
the year 1863 there were 36,800 pounds of wheat brought to the 
landing with one team. Three wagons were used to carry it. The 
grain was draivn a distance of twenty-flvc miles, from the ranch of J. 
C. Carey, on Putah creek. 

In 1863 there were 50,000 tons of grain shipped from this point. 
It was no uncommon occurrence for one hundred and eighty wagons 
to be seen in town in a single day, all loaded with grain, and each drawn 
by an eight or ten mule team. But te offset this, it may be mentioned 
that during the following year only one load of grain was brought into 
the town. There are at present in the towns of Maine Prairie and 
Alton one hotel, one store, one blacksmith -shop, and three warehouses. 

DENVERTON. 
This place was so called in honor of J. W. Denver- then member 
of Congress from this district — for the part he took in opposing the 
proposition for a wholesale bill of Congress to confirm all existing grants 
under ten leagues. 

The place was previotisly known as Nurse's Landing. Denverton 
liea nine miles east of Fairfield, and at the head of naWgation of 
Nurse's slough. 

In 1853, Dr. S. K. Nurse came to the place and built his residence, 
which was the first house in that vicinity. The country was then one 
vast field of wild oats, through which large herds of elk and antelope 
roamed at pleasure. 

About the same time that Dr. Nurse built his house, D. K. Barry 
located to the eastward of Nurse about one-half mile. 

The old house still stands on iis original site. In 1854, Dr. Nurse 
erected a store building; he also built a wharf with 100 feet frontage; 
this wharf has since been increased to 300 feet frontage. In 1866 
the doctor erected a brick store building that would do credit w any 
country town. 

In 1867 he erected a large brick warehouse near the wharf. It is 60 
by 160feet,and has a storage capacity of 2500 tonaof grain. He has 
also a large hay- warehouse. A post-office was established at Denverton 
in 1858. Dr. Nurse was appointed pMtmaster, and has held the office 
continuously ever since, making him nn incumbent of the office for 19 
yeara. He has probably held the office of postmaster longer at one place 
than aq|( man in the county or even the State. In 1875, Dr. Nuise 
constructed a telegraph line from Denverton to Suisun for his own 
convenience. In the spring of 1876 this line was merged into the 
Montezuma Telegraph Co., whose line now extends from Rio Vista to 
Suisun via Collinaville, Bird's Landing, and Dcnverten. It is 35 miles 
in length, and has six offices. Dr. Nurse is prcaident, and Dr. M. 
Ptetrzycki, of Bio Vista, vice-president. 

The township of Dcnverten is seven miles wide and nine long, and 
contains some of the best farming lands in Solano County. 



Among the early seltlore and principal land-ownere of the township 
may be mentioned Samael Stewart, who owns 3000 acrea, Dr. S- K. 
Nurse, who owns 1200 acres; idso the Daniels, Stewarts, and other*. 

There are at present in the lown one store and one blncksmith-sliop, 
oue wheelwright, one meat market, one bote], one Eehool-house, and a 
building erected by the Good Templare in 1S70. This building is 
used for lodge and ehurcli pnrposcs. A ohureh building is lowited 
near the town, and is under the auspices of the Methodiste. 

SUISUN. 

The name is of Indian origin, and is said to signify west wind. The 
city hearing the above name is siliiuted upon a navigable slough of 
Suisuii bay, and distant by water fiay miles from San Franciaco. 

At a very early day in the histoiy of the county the commernal 
importance of this point was noted, and it became the shipping port 
for the products of the Suisun valley and a largo portion of the 
county. In its most prosperous days, it is estimated that 25,000 tons 
of giain have been shipped from thb port in a single year. 

In the mouth of October, 1S50, Curtis Wilson and Dr. John 
Baker sailed up the slougli in an open boat, and landed at the present 
site of the city. It was covered with a dense growth of tules, among 
which Wilson and Baker discovered a herd of elk, and succeeded in 
killing one. 

To Captain Josruh "Wing belongs the honor of developing the 
commercial importance of the place. In 1S62 he erected a ware- 
house, and thenceforward the town was known as the emharcailero. 

The Ann Sophia, commanded by Captain Wing, was the firet 
schooner to transport the products of the valley. Immediately follow- 
ing the confitruction of the above-mentioned warehouse, trade began 
to spring up, and several settlers camo at about the same time upon 
the island. 

John Owen and A. W. Hall arc believed to have been the first 
merchanta to offer goods for sale. The growth and prosperity of the 
place steadily iucrcascd, and in 1854 the present town was laid out 
by Josiah Wing and John Owen. 

During the year 18G8 the inhabitants petitioned for the incorpora- 
tion of the town, and on the 0th day of October, 1868, the board of 
Bupervisora granted the prayer of the petitioners, and Suisun became 
an incorporated city, under the name and style of the " Inhabitants 
of the town of Suisun City." The present population numbers about 

600. 

There are resident hero three lawyers, five physicians, and three 
dentists. The business of the place is represented by a postroffice, 
bank, railroad depot, telegraph- and express-offices, two hotels, a steam 
flouring-mill, three warehouses, two wagon -factories, seven dry-goods 
and grocery-stores, two hardware-stoi-es, two harness-shops, two boot- 
and shoe-shops, three drug-stores, a newspaper- and printing-office, 
a livery-stable, three blacksmith-shops, two tailor-shops, barber- and 
butcher-shops, together with a sufficient number of saloons to supply 
the necessities of a California town, 

An excellent graded school, employing three teachers, supplies the 
educational wants of the city. 

The history of churches in Suisun is briefly this ; St. Alphonsis, 

Catholic, was established about the year 18G0, Father Dyeart, of Nnpa, 

officiating. He was followed by Fathers Ougar and McNaboe, the latter 

still remaining in charge. The construction of the present church 

edifice was begun in 1868, and a debt of S6000 thereby incurred, which 

has been entirely liquidated under the able management of Father 

McNaboe. The membership of this church is about three hundred. 

Grace Clmrch — Episcopal — was organized April 28, 1S67, as a 

mission cliurch, with Rev. Henry G. Perry, missionary. In 1872, 

Rev. Geo. H. Davis was settled as rector. At present it is under the 

missionary charge of the Rev. Giles A. Eaaton. Number of com- 

luunicante, twenty-four. In May, 1863, Mre. C. P. Reeves, assisted 

by Blrs. Hooke, organized a Sunday-school. I'liey were succeeded in 

charge by Mr. E. F. Gillespie, a worthy and highly-esteemed man, 

since deceased. The present number of pupils is si-tty-five, and the 

school is under the suporintendency of Mrs. Reeves. 

Congregational Church was organized Dccenihor 15, 1876, Rev. 

J. W. Brier first and present pastor. The society numbers about one 

hundred. 

VALLEJO. 

Vallejo is the southern terminus of the California Pacific R. R,, 
and is the most populous city of Solano County, containing about 
eight thousand inhabitants. It may truthfully be said of Vallejo that 
it was a city of great possibilities. It is probably speaking within 
bnunda to say that the natural commereial advantages attaching lo the 
site of this city are unexcelled by those of any city upon the Pacific 
coast. For a lime it appeared probable that iheso advantages would 
be availed of, and the city realize the growth and prosperity that her 
geographical position bespoke for her. Forluno ruled otherwise, and 
Vallejo, after a brief period of prosperity, saw the currents of trade 
setting in opposite direction, and her golden prospects vanish. 

The sanguine expectations entertained for Vallejo were iiir from 
visionary. The site is an admirablo oue. The city lies upon Napa 
bay, ail arm of the San Pablo bay, and its harbor is at the head of 



navigation for ships of the lai-est tonnage. Unlimited commercial 
advantages are afforded. The harbor is five miles long, a quarter oi a 
mile wide, thirty feet deep at low tide, and admirably protected from 

wind-storms. \v,\ 

None of the requisites of a great seaport town are wanting. W itu 
such natural advantages, the city for a time grew rapidly. Improve- 
ments were made and projects entertained, having in view its perma- 
nent prosperity and continuing growth. Schools and churches were 
established upon the basis of a large population in the future. Com- 
mercial and manufacturing industries were projected upon the most 
comprehensive scale. Here was made the firet experiment upon the 
Pacific coast of a grain -elevator, modeled after those in use in the 
grain handling cities of the eastern States. On the 4th day of Janu- 
ary 1869, the Vallejo Elevator Company, composed of I. Friedlandcr, 
president, Dr. Spencer, secretary, D. W. C. Rico, D. C. H=,skin, Charics 
Wheeler, I. Friedlandcr, and J. B. Trisbic, directors, commenced the 
consti-uction of a mammoth elevator on Vallejo bay. 

The enterprise did not prove a success. The grain merchants of 
the Pacific coast had become wedded to the idea of handling grain in 
Siieks; the insurance agencies discriminated against grain in bulk, and, 
to consummate the fatalities of the Vallejo elevator, a few years after 
its construction it fell, a total wreck, and was never reconstructed. ^ 

Among the enterprises projected on a large scale that met with 
complete success may be mentioned the Starr mills, one of the lai^cst 
and most complete flouring-mills on the coast, 

The first and second sessions of the State legislature were held at 
San Jose. The third and fourth sessions were organized at Vallejo, — 
the third meeting in the month of January, 1852, and the fourth in 
the year following. The sessions of the third were removed to Sacra- 
mento, and the fourth to Benicia. For the history of the endeavor to 
make this city the permanent capital of the State, and for other facts 
connected with its early settlement, we quote from Dr. Vallejo. 

" The country round about what Ls now Vallejo, was once in the 
absolute possession of numerous tribes of fierce and wariike Indiana, 
who looked with no favor on tho few whites who from time to time 
appeared among ihcm ; and they paid no heed to the mandates of the 
Slexican authorities, whose haidquartera were at Monterey. In 1835 
an expedition of 000 men was fitted out at Monterey by General 
Figueroa, military commandant and governor of the department of 
California. This expedition was placed in command of General M. 
6. Vallejo, then an officer in the Mexican service, and who had been 
for three years previously stationed in the lower country, with instruc- 
tions to proceed with it to this region, and to endeavor to make treaties 
with the various Indian tribes, if possible ; and if unable to do so, then 
he was to attempt their subjugation by force. The Indiana showed 
no disposition to negotiate, and so General Vallejo determined lo use 
the logic of force. His first battle with them occurred in Russian 
River valley, and the second and largest one was fought at what is 
now known as ' Thompson's Gardens,' a few miles north of Vallejo. 
The place was then called 'Soscol' (which means 'Artichoke' in 
EnHish), and subsequently corrupted to 'Soseol.' In this second 
battle General Vallejo lost two men killed, and several were wounded. 
Of the seven hundred Indiana engaged, two hundred were killed and 
a larfe number wounded. But this clioatiaement seemed only to ex- 
asperate them, for immediately thereafter they congregated in immense 
numbers from all the valleys round about, completely hemming in 
General Vallejo and his little band of soldie're. He notified General 
Fi"Tieroa of the state of affairs, and aaked to be immediately reinforced, 
adding, like a true soldier, that, if necessary, he would fight with what 
force ho had as host he could. General Figueroa promptly replied 
that he would himself come to his assistance with six hundred men, 
and designated Pctaluma creek (now Lakeville) as a place of rendca- 
vous for the two forces. After the arrival of this large force the 
Indians concluded that it would be wiser to make treaties than to fight, 
and so a grand council or ' pow-wow' was had ; treaties were made, 
the pipe of peace smoked, and peace once more reigned. This efTectcd, 
General Figueroa returned to tho capital (Monterey) with all his 
forces, leaving General Vallejo behind with a small force. 

" At this time the commander-in-chief directed General Vallejo to 
lay out a town where Sonoma is now standing. He did so, and a 
colony of four hundred and fifty Mexican families was sent to occupy 
it. But this colony was not successful. The people became discon- 
tented and mutinous, and General* Vallejo placed them all under arrest 
and sent them hack whence they came. The general had, by this time, 
become enamored of the country, and determined to make it his per- 
manent abiding place. To this end he applied to the supremo govern- 
ment for a tract of loud, and was invested with the ownership of what 
is now known as tho PoUiluma grant. At various limes during the 
troubles of Mexico, and her conscciuent pecuniary straits. General 
Vallejo furnished the government large sums of money and other sup- 
plies. In eonsidcnition of these favora, and in part payment liir his 
services as an officer in the government employ, the Soseol Ranoho 
wiis deeded to him. It was then known as the National Rancho. 
From tbli springs the title to land in ihis vicinity. When California 
was ceded to the Americans, General Vallejo accepted the new order 
of tbiiiga, and was olcetcd to tho convontion called to framo a State 



constitution. Subsequently, when in the State senate, the name of 
Solano was, at his suggestion, given to this county, being the nameof 
an Indian chief who had aided the general in the war against ihg 
Indians. He proposed the name of ' Eureka' for what is now tW 
city of Vallejo, hut his legislative colleagues, appreciating his efTorts 
for the settlement of the place, determined to honor hiin by giving lo 

it his own name," 

In 1850, General Vallejo determined to have the Stale capital per- 
manently located at this place, and to this end ho presented a mcuiorial 
to the logialalure. He proposed to grant to the State, free of coat, 
twenty acres for a State capitol and grounds, and for other Slale 
buUdings 136 acres, making in all 156 acres in the most desirable paita 
of Vallejo, But more than this, he likewise agreed to give $370,000 
in gold ! In his memorial (a remarkable document, now, as showing 
the general's prescience) he expressed the belief that this was tbe 
proper location for the permanent seat of government, for the reaam 
that it was the true centre of the State, the true centre of commerce, 
the true centre of population, and tho true centre of travel. He 
further stated that, " While the hay of San Francisco is acknowledged 
to be the first on earth, in point of extent and navigable capacitia, 
already, throughout the length and breadth of the wide world, itia 
acknowledged to be the very centre between Asiatic and European 
commerce. The largest ship that sails upon the broad sea can, witbin 
three hours, anchor at the wharves of tho place which your memorialist 
proposes aa your permanent seat of government. From this point, bj 
Btcam navigation, there is a greater aggregate of mineral wealth within 
eight hours' eteaming than exists in the Union besides ; from this 
point the great north and south rivers— the San Joaquin and Sacra- 
mento — cut the State longitudinally through the centre, fringing the 
immense gold deposits on the one hand, and untold mercury and other 
mineral resources on the other; from this point steam navigation 
extends along the Pacific coast south to San Diego, and north to the 
Oregon line, nflbrding the quickest possible facilities for our sea aasl 
population to reach the State capital in the feweat number of horns. 
This age, as it has been truly remarked, has merged distance into time. 
In the operations of commerce and the intercourse of mankind, to 
measure miles by the rod is a piece of vandalism of a by-gone age, 
and that point which can be approached from all parts of the State in 
the fewest number of houre, and at the cheapest cost, is the truest 
centre. . . . Tour memorialist most respectfully submits to your 
honorable body whether there is not ground of even still higher nation- 
ality; it is this: that at present, throughout the wide extent of oar 
sister Atlantic States, hut one sentiment seems to possess the entire 
people, and that is, to build, in the shortest po.=sible time, a railroad 
from tho Mississippi to the bay of San Francisco, whore its western 
terminus may meet a three weeks' steamer from China. Indeed, such 
is the overwhelming public sentiment of the American people upon 
this subject, there is hut little doubt to apprehend of its early complex 
tion. Shall it be said, then, while the whole worid is coveting onr 
possession of what all acknowledge to be the half-way house of the 
earth's commerce— the great bay of San Francisco— that the people 
of the rich possession are so unmindful of its value aa not to oniament 
her magnificent shores with a capitol worthy of a great State? 

" To enumerate more especially the local ndvantiges of this position, 
your memorialist will further add, that it is within two hours' steaming 
from San Francisco and six hours from Sacramento and Stockton cities, 
and between these points much the largest travel in the State duly 

occurs. 

" From this point three days' steaming will reach either Or^a 
on the north or San Diego on the south ; besides, the above-named 
location is unsurpassed lor abundance of lime and other building 
materials, with large agricultural advantages in the immediate neighbor- 
hood," 

The unanswerable aipiments of the memorialist convinced the leg- 
islature, and David C. Broderick submitted a report in its favor, in 
which occur those words : 

" Tour committee cannot dwell with too much warmth upon the 
magnificent propositions contained in the memorial of General Vallejo. 
They breathe throughout tho spirit of an enlarged mind and a sincere 
public benefactor, for which be deserves the thanks of his couotryinen 
and tho admiration of the worid. Such a proposition looks more like 
the legacy of a mighty emperor to his people than the free donation 
of a private planter to a great State, yet poor in public finance, but 
soon to bo among the first of tho earth." 

So, after a struggtc, Vallejo was made tho capital of the State. But 
it was not pennitted to long bo such. It did not subserve the interest 
of politicians that it should. Why, would be a long story, which has 
lost its interest by the lapse of lime. But the great foresight dis- 
played by General Vallejo, and the almost prophetic knowledge shown 
by him in the future growth of the State in commerce and populntiou 
—even to the foreshadowing of tlio great continental railway, and tho 
establishment of a lino of steamships lo tho Orient— is something 
remarkable. His name is inseparably connected with the history 
and growth of the young city which so proudly bears it; and tlio 
present generation will hand it down to posterity and deaervod immor- 
tality. 



15 



ORPHANS' HOME. 

Among the oliarilablo institutiona that do honor to the citizeoB of 
Volleio ifl the Home for Orphans. The institution belonga to the 
CiooJ Templar of California and Nevada, although the advantages of 
the home aro not restricted to the unfortunate children of the order, 
and ils charities are extended lo nil orphans. Mrs. Elvira Baldwin ia 
accredited with the honor of originating the idea of establishing this 
orphanage, but the meana employed to vitalize the idea are due to 
William H. Milla and G. W. Simonton. The mention of the above 
names, however, is not in diaparagement of the scores of noble men 
and women who labored in behalf of thia worthy cntorpriae. 

In the latter part of 1867 the Orpbana' Homcatead Association was 
formed and a large tract of land purchased in what is known aa the 
Ilannibal ranch. Twenty acres were reserved for the site and the 
gronnds of the home, and (he remainder divided into 334 lots, 50 x 
130 feet which were sold out at auch a rate as to enable the asaociation 
to realize on the enterprise a profit of nearly $20,000. 

On tlio Uth day of May, 1869, the eorncr-stone of the Btruotnre 
was laid, and the liome, thongh unfinished, dedicated on the first day 
of October 1869. It ia located abont one mile northeast from the 
centre of the city, and commands a magnificent view of the bay, the 
city, and the surrounding country. It is capable of accommodating a 
large number of inmates, and is designed to afford ample educational 

advantages. 

The city in addition to the most adequate ehuccb and school advan- 
tages, exoela any town of like population on the Pacific coast in the 
number of its charitable, literary, musical, tcmpemnoe, and social ao- 

"'"^"^' WHITK SULrHUR SFHINGS. 

Owing to the proximity of these justly celebrated springs, the city 
claims them as one of its numerous advant^es. 

They are situated about three miles in a northeasteriy direction from 

the city, and for a long time have been resorted to by large numbers 

in pursuit of health and pleasure. The waters are pronounced bene- 

fioiul in relieving the human system of the " ills that fleah is heir to," 

while the delightful natural scenery renders it a desirable place for 

recreation. 

MARE ISLAND. 

A sketch of the city of Vallejo necessitates some account of Mare 
island, the location of the only United States navy yard on the Pacific 
coi\fit. To those who have wondered that auch a pretty spot should he 
christened with such an unpoetic name, the reason therefor will ap- 
pear from the brief histoiy of its origin, as given by Dr. Vallejo. 

" In early days the only ferry-boat on the waters near Vallejo and 
Benioia was a rude one made chiefly of oil barrels obtained from 



wlmling shipa, and propelled by sails. These barrels were secured to- 
gether by beams and planking, and it was divided into compartments 
for the accommodation of cattle, to the transportation of which it was 
chiefly devoted. One day, while this boat was coming frum Slariinez 
to Bcnicia, a snddcu ajunll overtimk it, and the craft pitched fearfully; 
the animals (chiefly hohais) became restive, and some of tbcm broke 
through it. The boat was npsct and the living cargo thrown into the 
hay. Some of the live-stock were drowned, and some managed to 
reach either shore by swimming. One of the horses (an old white 
mare owned and much prized by General Vallejo) succeeded in cflcct- 
ing a landing on the island, and was rescued there a few days after by 
the general, who thereupon called the place ' IbIb de la Tegua, or Marc 
Island.' " 

It lies in the San Pablo bay, at the mouth of the straits of Car- 
quincz, and comprises about 3000 acres. Some time between the years 
1840 and 1S4C, it appears that one A^ictor Castro obtained pcrmisbiun 
from the Mexican government to herd his horses upon the island ) 
that in 1846 Castro received from Governor Alvurado a deed absolutely 
convoying to Castro the title to the island. The United States gov- 
ernment derives iu title through John B. Triable and Beezor Simmons, 
the grantees of Castro. 

The first American settlers on the island were William Bryant and 
Major Stephen Cooper, the latter of whom retained possession for 
some time ; that a claim of ownership, adverse to the government, has 
been asserted by parties claiming title from Victor Castro derived 
through Bryant and Cooper. 

In 1854 the United States government — through Admiral David 
Q. Farragut, then a commander in the navy — toot formal possession 
of the island for naval purposes. 

Admiral Farrogut remained in command for abont four years, and 
it was under his supervision that most of the buildings were projected. 

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 

January 1, 1876, to January, 1877, as appear by county asscssor'a 
report. 

Land inclosed in 1876 .... 9,652 acres. 



Land cultivated in 18 
Acres of wheat . 
Bushels of wheat 
Acres of barley 
Bushels of barley 
Acres of oats 
Bushels of oats . 
Acres of com . 
Bushds of corn 



109,394 " 

93,575 

1,965,175 

15,819 

553,665 

145 

. 4,700 

. 237 

. 5,980 



Acres of beans . 

Bushels of beans 

Acres of potatoes 

Tons of potatoes 

Acres of sweet potatoes 

Tons of sweet potatoes 

Acres of hay 

Tons of hay 

Pounds of butter 

Founds of wool 

Value of fruit crop 

Bearing orange- trees 

Total fruit-trees of all kinds 

Acres of grape-vines 

Gallons of wine 

Gallons of brandy 

Breweries 

Horses .... 

Mules .... 

Total number of horned cattle 

Sheep .... 

Cashmere and Angora goats 



city 



Number of acres (other than city 

town lota) 
Value of real estate (other than 

and town lots) 
Value of improvements thereon 
Value of city and town lota 
Value of improvements thereon 
Value of personal properly 
Total value of all property in county 



and 



25 
400 
20 
60 
U 
23 
13,502 
19,515 
118,800 
427,240 
£112,000 
. 264 
302,917 
1,387 
149,710 
2,200 
. 3 
5,476 
622 
12,790 
71,146 
35 
8,332 



499,036 

85,450,028 

536,776 

850,559 

1,014,099 

1,419,084 

9,494,804 



By the county treosurer'e statement of May 1, 1877, the outatand- 
ing indebtedness of Solano County appears as follows : 

Koad fund .... $49,000.00 

General fund .... 63,800,00 

Funded bonds of 1854 . . 700.00 

Railroad bonds and iotereat 141,220.00 



Balances on hand applicable to payment 
of same 



8254,720.00 

. 14,900.00 
$239,820.00 



16 



OOV^OBS O. TH. .O..KT. T.KB.TOK.. «!, S..^ O^J^^^^^^^^^^^J-^^J^^IJI^ 



SPANISH GOVERNOnS 



Gnspitr de Portala- 

Fulipo Barri 

Felipuda Neve .-■ 

Pedro Fagc! 

Jopfi Antonio Ronien 

J036 Joaquin tie Arrillaga.. 

Die^ttdo Boricn 

Joay- Joaquin do Arrillaga,, 

Josu Argucllo 

Poblo Vincents de Holo 




MEXICAN GOVERHOBS. 



PnLIo Vincenle ile Sola. 

Luis ATguello 

3{,s6 Maria Eclieandin... 

Manuel Victoria 

Pio Pico. 

Jose Figueroii 

Joifi Castro 

Nicholas GuiaTro/. 

Mariano Chico 

NiclioluB Ouilcrrez 

Juan B. Alvarndo 

Munucl Slicholtorenft.,.. 
Pio Pico 



From 


To 


1822 


1823 


1823 


1825 


1825 


1831 


1831 


1832 


1882 


1833 


1833 


]83f> 


1836 


1838 


1830 




1830 




1830 




1B3G 


1842 


1842 


1846 


1845 


1846 



AHERICftH HltmRY GOVERNORS, 



Commodore John D. Slint 

Commodore Robert F. Stockton. 

Colonel John G. X^'romont... 

General Steplien W. Kcnrney.... 

Colonel Kiellard It. Mason 

General Bennett Kiloy 



Ywr. 



1646 
181fi 
1847 
1847 
1847 
1849 



STATE GOVERNORS. 



Veir, 



♦Peter H. Burnett 1840 

John MeDougall 1851 

John Biglcr 

J. Ncelcy Johnson 

John B. WoUcr 

♦Milton S. Latham 

John G. Downey 

Leiand Stanford ,*. 

-f-Frederick F. Low 

Henry H. Haight 

♦Newton Booth 

Eomauldo rnclicco ■ 

"William Irwin 



1852 
1850 
18JS 
18U0 
18fiO 
18G2 
1SG3 
1867 

i8;i 

18T6 

1876 



1 Term of omeo Incronsoil from two tu four jcan. 



' ncilgnxl' 



OFFICERS OF SOLANO COUNTY FKOM THE YEAR 1850 UNTIL 1878^ 



YEAR, 



1850 

1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
18G3 
18G4 
1865 
1866 
1867 
18fi8 

1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1876 
1875 
1877 
1878 



COUNTY JUDGE. 



Joscpli 'Winston. 



TboB M. Swnn. 



Geo. LcvisLon. 



Wm. X, "WcatoD. 



"Win. S- Wella. 
Tho3. M. Bwun. 



0. B, Powers. 



John M, Gregory. 



• „„„.,.„ SUPERINTENDENT OF 

~^,~^K. COUNTY TREASURER. COUNTY SURVEYOR. COUNTY ASSESSOR. CO"'^TV RECORDER. BOUNTY ATTORNEY, SCHOOLS. 



Sarehall Bynum. 
Jo3. P. Vaughn. 

W. J'. Hoolon. 
11 II 

II II 

II 11 

Perry ■Williams. 
II II 

H. B. Sheldon. 
11 II 

II II 

"Wm. J. Costigan, 



0. A. Kidder. 
"Wm, J- Ooatignn, 
Joel A. Harvey, 

11 II 

11 II 

Alex. Dunn. 



David F. Bevoridge. 
>i II 

Samuel 0. Gray. 

John C. Gulick. 

II 11 

Jabez Hatch. 
R. M. Holladay. 
R. P. BIflin. 
Anthony Hubbs. 



Samuel 0. Gray. 
II II 

John Ferroll. 
John B. Lemon. 
John "Wentworth. 

II 11 

John B. Lemon. 
II 11 

E. D. Porkine. 
II II 

W- Or. "Wyman. 
John B. Lemon. 



Bonj. "W. Barlow. 

James I. Stratton. 

Hans Patton. 
II II 

David "Wade. 

E. A. DoHemecourt. 

John T. Ponhody. 

II II 

II 11 

II II 

John Woolnvor. 

"Wm. "W. Pitch, 



A. H. Gunning. 

Alexander Dunn, 
11 •' 

"Wm. "W. Filch. 



Stephen Cooper, 

II II 

Singleton Vaughn. 
Henry B. Amnions. 

J; S. Jamison. 

Bcnj. H. Brown. 

11 II 

E. H. Von Pflster. 

Cyrus Ager. 

B. W. Parker. 

C. A. Pine. 
II 11 

J.W. Batchelor.liitD. 
"W. A.Duflhiel,2dDia. 
jr. A. Long, 3d Dis. 
N. B. S. Coleman. 
II II 

Joseph Hoyt. 
II II 

II II 

II II 

John "Woods. 



County Clerk noted 
naBecordor until 1862. 



'W. It. Solts. 

Geo. H. Eidell. 
II II 

H. G. "ft'ctmore. 
II II 

(1 II 

Hiram K. Snow. 
II II 

Geo. C. McKinloy. 
II II 

B. F. Gillespie. 
Wm. "Wolf. 
T. H. Chandler. 
II It 

0, Knoi Marshall, 



Thos, M. Swan. 
11 11 

Lyman Leslie. 

II II 

P. Cohton. 

Jnmus H. Thompson. 
II II 

"Wm. Ewing. 
II II 

J. C. Hinckley. 

John Doughty. 
11 II 

Jos. McKcnna. 
II II 

II II 

II II 

Geo. A, Lament, 

Jos. F. "Wendell. 



0. B. Coghlnn. 



Jamea "W. Anderson. 
11 II 

Horace N, Lillie. 

Sylvester "Woodbridge. 

Jos. "W. Hine. 
II II 

G. W. Sinionton. 



"Wm. H. Fry. 
II II 

II II 

C. "W. Cbilds. 
II II 

II 11 

II II 

J.£. Bateman. 



CORONER. 



"W. T. Peabody. 

II II 

Larkin Bichardson. 

John "W- Jonea. 

II n 

~W. "W. Chapman. 
II 11 

T. A. "Wood. 

D. F- Beveridge. 
T. C. Everts. 
M. W. Pratt. 

A. F. Knorp. 

N. B. Bice. 

B. M. Apg.ir, 
L. D. Sanborn. 

II II 

E. C, Holbrook, 



James Toplay, 



A, L, "White. 



YEAR. 



1R50 

1861 

1852 

1863 

1864 

1855 

1850 

1857 

1858 

1859 

I8C0 

1881 

1802 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1865 

1807 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1878 

1674 

1875 

1870 

1877 

1678 



OFFICERS OF SOLANO COUNTY FROM THE YEAR 1850 UNTIL l8'7S.-antinued. 



COUNTY SHERIFF. 



Francis Brown. 
II 11 

Paul Shirley. 



B. T. Oaborn. 

J. M. Wovillo. 
i( II 

II . II 

II u 

B. F. GiUofipie. 
II II 

John S. "Wood. 
II II 

Amos Bohcrts. 

Isaac Hohbs. 

Joseph Jacobs. 

E, D. PorkinB. 
II II 

John E. Williston. 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS. 



Thos. H. Owen. 



A. M. Stevenson. 
II II 

N. H. Davis. 

Nathan Cutler. 
J. M. Swan. 
II II 

J. M. Dudley. 
II It 

M. "WoHson. 
J. M. Lemon. 

II (I 

John B. Fri3l)ie. 
II II 

B, C. Haile. 
II II 

M. J. "Wright. 

II II 

John L. Hcald. 
II II 

T. M. Swan. 
Jos, McKonna. 
II II 

J. T. Dare ond E, 0. 
Haile, 



"Wm, Bobinson, 
Harvey Lee. 
John Curry, 



Alex. Ridell. 
"W. S. "Wells, 
J. W. Sanborn. 
John S. Miller. 
J. Gardner. 
0. A. Cellars. 
F. J, Bartlott. 
II II 

Joseph Hcwett. 



John E. Low. 
II II 

Hazen Hoyt, 
II II 

Solomon Decker, 

II i< 

Haacn Hoyt. 



AUDITOR. 



Prior to 1875, the 
duties of Auditor 
wore discharged by 
the County Recorder, 



Thos. P. Hooper, 



BOARD OF SUPERVISORS. 



Prior to 1856, the duties of tho Board of Supervisors were disebDrged by the Court of Sessions. 



Floyd A, Eider, 
Floyd A. Rider, 
Ei ell aids on Long, 
Sampson Smith, 
J. G, Gardner, 

D. B. Holman, 

E, F. Gillespie, 
J. J. Barry, 
"W. B. Davis, 
"W. B. Davis, 
Ehen Hilton, 
0. S. Gushing, 
0. S. Cushing, 
Samuel flreck, 
J. M. Howard, 
J. M. Howard, 
J. F. Cloutman, 
J. F, Cloutman, 
J. P. Cloutman, 
J. F, Cloutman, 
J, H. Hillhorn, 
John Callonder, 
John Cullender, 
J. B. Hoyt, 



A, "W. Bodgors, 
A. "W, Eodgers, 
Geo, Loviston, 
Joseph L. Likins, 

D, B, Holman, 

E. F. Gillespie, 
J. J. Barry, 
Sampson Smith, 
Sampson Smith, 
Sampson Smith, 
Sampson Smith, 
Sampson Smith, 
Sampson Smith, 
J. JI. Howard, 
Samuel Breok, 
Samuel Breck, 
A. D. Stnrr, 

A. D. Starr, 

A. D. Slarr, 

Goo. "W. McDorraott, 

J. F. Brown, 

J. B. Hoyt, - 

J, B. Hoyt, 

James McOrory, 



John C. Fislt. 
John C. Fisk. 
Sidney Clark. 
Jodediah "Williams. 
E. F. Gillespie. 
J, J. Barry. 
Sampson Smith. 
"W. B. Davis. 
Bben Hilton. 
Ebon Hilton, 

C. S. Gushing. 

D. N. Hastings. 
John Brownlee. 
John Brownlee, 
John Callendor. 
John Cullender. 
Somuel Breck, 
Samuel Breok. 

Geo. W. McDormoll. - „ Pn„.oll 

S k' Baker D. W. Harrier, Jnmos MeCrory, 

D. W- Harrier, 3- n^- Uakur, 



NorK._pon,«rgi„aI column n,«rl«to™hips or .unarvisor'sdiatri.,, • ^^^' MINOR CIVIL DIVISIONS, EtC, 1870 



17 



■itualed 



ALAMEDA. (ll) 

Alameda 

Brooklyn 

llrouklyn 

Eden 

Hiiyu-iird 

Suiijx'nndrn.^... 

Murniy 

O'lklund 

Oiiklnnd 

■^'usliinglon ■ 

Alvarado 



ALPINE, (fi) 



AMADOU, (c) 

1. Jilckwn 

2. luno 

3. V"leuno 

4. Sillier 

0. Drydiwii 

II, FiJdIctown 



nUTTK. (rfj 

Dldwoll 

Concow 

Chico 

nnniil 1(111 

Kimslipw 

MoiiDiiiinSprine 

Ojiliir 

Oroville 

Orpgon 

Oro 

'Wyamiotio 



1,557 
2,8IC 
],G03 
3,841 

420 
2.400 
11,104 
10,500 
3,010 
915 



44 

202 
114 

201 
IGO 
34 



2,408 
1,770 
1,357 

853 
1,219 



869 
1,G38 
1,002 
1,773 
305 
254 
1,407 
6,940 



4. 
Q. 
0. 
7. 
8. 
0. 
10. 



CAL.lVJiBAS. (tfj 



COLUSA. (/) 

Biitio :..:. 

Colusa 

Colusn , 

Ornnd Itlund 

ifonroo 

Princulon 

Sloiicy Creek 

Spring Vpillcy. 



COKTRA COSTA. {<j) 



Marti noz... 
San Pnblo., 



837 

490 

8,714 

1,130 

857 

204 

2,430 

1,425 

1,100 

281 

731 



050 
1,800 
1,C00 
1,178 
1,748 
1,129 

480 



004 

2,193 

1,051 

702 

1,130 

132 

686 

850 



177 



80 
66 
97 
186 
84 
23 



1,170 

1,094 

840 

1,167 

4Sfi 

702 



1,178 

601 
I,5C8 
199 
172 
933 
4,164 



1,324 
188 



1,407 

2,C30 

1,000 

8.138 

487 

412 

2,159 

10,142 



178 
16S 

2,790 
509 
472 
106 

1,658 



DEL NORTE, (A) 
Crosetnt 



Criaccnt Cily 

Hnppy Ciimp 

Hounlain 

Smith's Eivor..,."" 



EL DOEADO, (i) 

Oolonift 

Coiumno 



2,001 
660 
1,070 
1,850 
4,010 



977 
458 
382 
09 
664 



925 
542 



813 
216 
004 



632 

730 
765 
694 
1,041 
661 
264 



600 
1,770 
769 
571 
926 
87 
684 
687 



1,238 
085 
017 
809 
367 
617 



109 
827 
924 
561 
886 
98 
872 



1,278 

431 

041 

1,498 

3,015 



832 
853 
178 
42 
528 



499 
372 



356 
CG 

227 



438 
1,070 
830 
484 
707 
468 
216 



104 
423 

292 
131 

204 
45 
52 

163 



723 
120 
434 
352 
1,595 



145 

105 

204 

57 

86 



426 

170 



2,721 
269 



44 
102 

112 
207 
127 
34 



1,988 
1,330 
1,218 
P,B58 
CJO 
849 



243 
256 

3,176 
640 
660 
199 

2,054 



ip o, ..p„i... au,H..;p^rc" Sa"Sis^XSi:?.°jxi;tv.^^ 



El Bohabo— Cont'd. 

Diumond Spring 

Georgetown 

Grocnivood ," 

Kolsoy's ' 

Lako Valley .'..'.'..", 

Jrountflin ."' 

Mud Springs .','.'.'" 

Plnoorvillo „ 

Placer ville.... 

Salmon Ffills 

■Whilo Ouk 



FKES.VO. (j) 



1,122 
253 
687 



744 

1,289 
1,336 
1,084 
1,519 
1,040 
394 



665 
1,961 
806 
619 
D79 
109 
038 
727 



1,966 
642 
1,063 
1,826 
4,477 



11 



HUMBOLDT, (k) 

Areola 

Bueksport 

KelKivor 

fiiirekn 

Multoto ''.'.■■ 

PnciBc \[ 

South Forlc 

Table Bluir. .■.■■■" 



IKTO. (;) 

Bisliop Creek 

Corro Gordo 

Iridependeneo 

Lono Pine 



ICERN. (,„) 



536 
869 
118 
74 
281 



663 
467 



KLAir.iTii. (n) 
Dillon 

iIoo|ja "^'nlley In- 

diDnRescrviilion 

Klamntli 

Camp Giiaton.. 
Liberty 

Sawyer's Bar.. 

Orleans 

Salmon 

South Pork 

Trinidad 

Trinidad 



1,055 

1,023 

077 

316 

246 

271 

1,572 

2,624| 

1,662 

428 

751 



2,836 
1,760 
1,740 



924 

388 
827 
2,049 
463 
818 
273 
408 



624 
474 

40', 
458 



629 
510 
120 
GIG 
820 
230 



79 

12 
278 
118 
348 
100 
173 
136 
280 
874 
160 



LAKE, (oj 

iBt Supervisor's dist'ct 
Knoivillo Mines. 
Lower Lake... 

2d Supervisor's district 
IJakoport 

3d Supervisor's district 

IiAfiSEN. (p) 

Jnneaville 

Long Valley 

Milford 

SuEunville 



LOS ANOELES. (g) 

El Monte 1,264 

Azasa 320 

Los Angeles 2,776 

Los Angeles 0,728 

Los Nietos 1,044 

San Gabriel 43G 

Santa Ana 1,445 

Auahuira | 881 



1,156 
164 
G92 
S80 
248 
933 



441 

135 
113 

638 



636 
669 
297 
218 
108 
130 
953 
1,670 
031 
184 
456 



2,001 
1,SI8 
1,065 



603 
267 
725, 
1,282 
404 
09 
251 



480 
162 
263 
269 



477 
460 
82 
496 
477 
165 



45 

10 
160 

00 
106 

81 
100 

81 

75 
207 
109 



420 
854' 

200! 
971 
48 

135 

619 

951 

571 

244 

296 



442 
86 



S82 

85^ 

469 

290 

2^14 

212 

1,244 

2,200 

1,318 

290 

671 



231 
121 
102 

7C7 
49 

121 
22 
81 



144 
322 
137 
189 



152 

00 

38 

120 

843 

65 



34 



1,879 
633 
847 



916 
384 
825 
1,999 
443 
810 
252 
397 



616 
296 
378 
319 



898 

474 

85 

872 
728 
136 



tOB ASOELES.— Con. 

San Jo^u 

San Junn 

Soledad ,■.'.'.".','." 

Wilmington .....".. 

Compton „. 



(>■} 



12 



885 
87 
530 
821 
225 
777 



401 
112 
104 
601 



1,064 

248 

1,997 

8,724 

1,274 

382 

1,020 

680 



118 

58 

242 

79 

04 

105 

211 

117 

01 



271 
127 
162 
59 
23 
106 



190 
72 
779 
2,004 
270 
104 
420 
201 



41 

12 
226 
110 
197 
120 
111 
40 
99 
355 
163 



1,131 

104 
682 
874 
246 
820 



ATAKi^r. 

Bolinna 

Nnvato [["[ 

Nicuisio 

Point Heycs 

San Eafael..*. .". 

Son Jiafoc] ......... 

San Antonio 

Santclilo "' 

Tomnlcs 



StARirOSA, (i) 



440 
132 

112 
626 



1,246 

317 
2,045 
6,349 
1,535 

42Q 
1,427 



MENDOCISO, (t) 

Andoraon 

Anderson 

Big Itivor 

Albion 

BiglliverC) 

Casper 

Cuffy's Cove '.'. 

Little Eiver 

Noyo 

Novarro 

Ten-Mile Itiver... 

Calpolln 

Little Lake .„, 

Punta Arenas 

Bourn's Landing. 

Purgue's Cove 

GuaTnla 

Punta Arenas 

Bound Valley. 

Round V alley Re- 

servation 

Snnel 

Ukiab 



474 
44 

265 
942 

160 



625 

417 
092 
271 

2,095 
841 
451 
731 

1,121 



1,420 
585 

1,732 
835 



MONO, [ll] 

Antelope 

Bcnfon 

Bridgeport 

Urictgeporl... 



aiONTEBET. (d) 

Alisa 



Salinas City.. 

San Antonio.. 
Cttstroville 

CaBtrovlllo..., 
Monterey 

Monterey 

Pajaro 

San Bonito 

San Juan 



NAPA, (in) 

Hot Springs 

Napn , 

Nnpa City..., 
Yount- 



079 

023 

1,911 

115 

473 

196 

168 

108 

60 

315 

80 

807 

946 

1,406 

40 

40 

236 

966 

444 

15 
371 
906 



162 
94 

174 
60 



410 

849 
102 
647 
141 



390 
218 
808 
165 
1,480 
540 
231 
819 
055 



624 

248 
912 
408 



590 

634 

1,284 

74 
818 

60 
108 

9G 

50 
179 

63 
780 
886 
977 

IS 

36 
126 
663 



13 

333 
901 



146 
66 



64 

9G 

103 

2'J5 

19 



235 
204 
284 
100 
1,216 
301 
220 
412 
4C6 



796 
337 
820 
427 



470 
440 

264 
919 

160 



698 
364 
655 
242 

2,455 
803 
450 
717 

1,013 



1,010 
403 

1,289 
690 



NEVADA, (x) 

Bloomflold 

Bridgeport 

Eureka 



2,723 
599 
761 

1,302 
436 

1,923 

1,112 
761 
529 

2,038 



2,120 
3,791 
1,879 
1,252 



40 



89 

627 
41 

156 

13G 
00 
02 
30 

136 
17 
27 
CO 

429 
22 
4 

110 
293 

01 



66 



036 
1,829 
1,249 



2,108 
454 

685 

1,004 

371 

1,004 

890 

500 

40G 

2,058 



1,686 
2,657 
1,368 
1,051 



384 

1,034 

63S' 



016 
145 
170 
298 
65 
410 
217 
171 
123 
580 



434 

1,134 

611 

201 



617 

617 

1,546 

111 

450 
19 
158 
158 

76 
311 

80 

807 

939 

1,178 

32 

40 
190 
905 
488 



NEVADA.— Continued. 

Lillle York 

MeadnuLako 

Nevada 

Bnuiihand Efafiy ' 

"Waabinglon 



1. 



PLACEK. (y) 
licgovillc.... 



Auburn 



Hewcastlc 

Pino 

Rocklin 



15 
870 
901 



160 
91 

13 
59 



2,625 
081 
720 

1,248 
425 

1,737 

1,056 
70O 
610 

2,543 



PLDUAfl. (l) 

Goodwin 

Indian 

Slineral 

Plumas 

Quincy 

yuanz 

Iticb Bar 

Seneca 

"Waabinglon 



SACRAMENTO, (im) 

Alabama 

American 

Brighton 

Center 

Ooflumnes 

Dry Creek 

Franklin 

Qeorgiana 

Granite 

Lee 

Mifisisaippi 

Naloma 

Sacramento 

San Joaquin 

Sutler 



868 
1,055 
3,986 
1,210 

638 



063 
115 
098 

1,439 
800 

2,660 

1,122 
923 
764 
330 

1,284 
651 
101 
042 

1,030 
209 



089 
880 
400 
040 
208 
810 
200 
400 
620 



BASBERNAKDIHO. (bb) 

Belleville 

Cbino 

San Bernardino.... 
San Salvador 



253 
790 
711 



Grass Valley ] 7,OG3l8,C90| 3,367 



1,997 
3,510 
1,713 
1,218 



688 
1,517 

908 
0,008. 



SAN DIEQO, (ce) 

Fort Tuma 

Colorado 

Julian 

LaPalu 

Milquaty 

Pnta Valley Res- 
ervation 

Powy 

SanDiogo 

San Jacinlo 

San Luis Bey 

San Pasqual , 

San Pasqual Val- 
ley Reservation 

Temacula 

Warner's Ranch.... 



410 

0O9 

401 

694 

0031 

1,272 

I,06G 

1,579 

876 

171 

523 

11} ,288 

1,073 

1,078 



3,004 
600 



GUI 
918 
a,345 
782 
281 



474 
02 

887 
700 
400 
1,409 
676 
346 
400 
176 
727 
201 
104 
362 
670 
104 



223 
611 
129 



3G7 

737, 

1,0411 

428| 
367 



189 
28 
866 
679 
400 
1,361 
446 
6 

854 
160 
557 
290 
87 
180 
330 
155 



416 

269 
271 

257 



609 

69 

262 

108 



27G 
219 
713 
211 
404 
457 
809 
274 
553 
307 
89 
280 



BAN FRANOIHCO, (ifrf) 

San Franciuco 



331 
229 
531 
120 
324 

40 

91 

2,300 

92 

330 

275 

117 
140 
240 



10,081 
823 
672 



19 

264 

2,675 

470 



120 
77 

424 
85 

302 

29 

75 

1,748 

85 

306 

207 

66 
111 
193 



241 

lai 

136 
362 



60 

197 

106 

250 

290 

146 

403 

782 

1,026 

69 

82 

243 

6,202 

250 

406 



789 
1,230 
8,244 
1,016 

475 



606 
112 
431 

1,028 
660 

2,047 
960 
600 

OGl 

295 
1,091 
433 
151 
607 
846 
226 



301 
817 
226 
605 



786 
144 

827 
377 



332 

330 

B77 

301 

474 

659 

1,132 

460 

659 

369 

184 

391 

14,485 

1,014 

1,000 



418 

10 



149.473 



75,754 



87 
44 

489 
90 



211 
162 

110 
85 
22 

17 

16 
662 

7 
29 
68 

60 
29 
53 



60 

308 

3,040 

660 



229 
629 
120 
324 

46 

89 

2,284 

92 

309 

276 

117 

180 
2-13 



73,719 13e.059'l330 




C1.1I1-.*.: K]Srl'i,S'i^>" "H.'"='"^" 8' CI''"™ "''■' * Iiidlnn.; Con 
(') l-Xori.?- .*■ ^i.J^'"'""''. '-1 Himi-o niMl 12 InJinns. 

^;in,i.Ta^p"S,'5.^J^-■,"'|''M^^^^ 



DrftoHD, 

-,235 Cbtooio: Chico.OOB OilnMo; Ilninlllon, 470 
nrl IS Indbnii; Oi>lilr,34B Clilncta; OtcEan.43 ChEncsm Oro, 10 

; luwnalilp G, ^00 CUInt-ao; lovmliiv l>, i&C Cainiui!; tgvrnililp T, tU 
"' ~ ■ . - - .. Xorriulifra 



J 02 



I'fil^"" '^""''' ■ ■'"'"""'' "'*'■ '""''"'" ' Cl'l"""! ^"S Vnliey, 2 Cblniao mid 1 Indlna; Mllfonl, 1 C!iln«e; SOBnYilFp. 
(•}) Loj AngolM Oonnlj-: El Mn»io nlso InduJa B Chlnac; Los AnKelcs, 10 ChlnrM bii<I M In.ir.m- I« Ji™i.. ni, na 

(r) M-io O.L.nlj_: B=lin^_.l„, Iucl..dc=. 11 CJ.In.«o .i.d_l(r_Indl»ui;_N^v«,u, Jl Cl.l„«<.n„J 17 Iiili.n.; Ki™.!., * Chlntr- — i 



13 




ndary I 
Iuwiii]ilp2,lTCIitiiD 



i^; iDirntlilp.lillT Olilnmi 



nUlaat' ""'"- '''""'"''ll' " nl*" ilnJudi.-a 20 Cli[nc 

W Oiln«o*lml'f,*l'mri!i: "^^.l' Sl^" '"'^^i'^" '^^ Clilncw onil 407 Indliun; Ilnppr Comp, IK! Chlnao nail 03 IniUaui; IIouhDId 

((J El IJ.,^„ ^„^'™: ^^-V'"" "'■". a,Cl.ln".. «nd 27.1 ludlan.. 
niamo,!,] KpHnirliaiArin^. ,,.';?'"'''* -"^ Chfniwc, 1 Indlnn, and 111 JniunMo; CoiumnM, 70 Obinim oad 1 Iiiillnn; 

'>^,7HCI,IoX '"""■'"''"■" ™°«';SIudBrriPB,301ClilnM(;Pla«rrlllo.iMCTilno«; Salmon FnlU. 117 Ch[nc«; WWlo 

^BCliln"X^"s7ff,,^°,'™''''''"''" '"""''"^ ClilDMO aoJOIMInaiuiu; lowiishlp i, 3% Cbinoan nnd 828 Iiidbli»| lownaLlp 

■aachlncwnndaiiidtniu; liudupaiUi Indbru: Eul RlTcr.alndlnm; Eureka, 3a 
") Inyo roi,i,-,."m i' "r.VT' V ■■.•"f "J' '^¥"','^. KliidlnnB; Konili Fork, 21 InrtJoni.; T.iMo Bluff, 11 Indliiu. 
Unjfan.: l,,,"i,|,,^iTy,V^'"'''°^'':'!!'^''''^!^OIr.dlnn^ 



Cltt''n^^)'/^"""^*™'» "I" ""^"'J'- 

(lil^fr. " '"'"■"'; Mallolo, 10 rndiau,; 
'«; k" i, /"" ""'■ * ^'•'"'•■^ »"'> l^'' Ini 
"ndysi* ii^ Indbmr [ovraibip*. ID Clilr 



J^VX'I^,''tX!'.iwtl^^^^^^^^ "d7I,idi.n.; l...n.Lrp3,.15aia«,: .o«„.l,rp 3. 333 n,in«a 

(11 McndorJno Count) ; And.Tson nTJo Includpifi ChlnPioandBBIndtnin: Hit- IliTer,2t Clilnraonnilsan Indrnri.- tltllnr.nl.„ 
7 lodl™.; runu Aronaj, DU Cb ,,,« a.d 13) ludJaaa; Itound Vnll.r. 4 Indl^u.r &m.l^ 

(b) MoiinCouiily; Antulupoalw [nclodiii IndJinj; Ilonlon.3Cliinc«p; UridKCportlia Oiln™ , n.uinao»oo j jnauia 

(c) jronl^i>.Y Counrj: AllB. nl» [ncludoi 32 <.lil„«o and O) ludlwi.r CojlmviUo, 43 Cliluwi nnd B Indian.- Knntorer IB 
CliinpdoandDilndlnni; Pnjum, I Cliiupio; San Bunlto.l!! Iiidliin<: San Jilon l>2 Clilnoio nnd US Indian* ' """"'"ri "• 
and"lU^'n^aS'""^' ""' ^'"'"^ "'" '"'"''" '" Cliln™ and 4 iDdliu; KajB, Itl Chlnao and 40 Indlani; Younl, 7 ChJnao 

d.l alM intliidM47 CTilnMo; Bridgf port, 300 CLInao Bnd2 Indiani; Eumk^lTO ClJnMo; Gnu. 
an. Llll I, \ork, 2S Clili,™ ; ifiaJow Lake, m Cl,Jn«o; NoiaJ.-;. 000 CWnao and 1 yndiin; 
ind 1 Indian; Hulilnt-lQn, lECblntw. . - , >.^,, 

dilp5,110ChrnPM; lu™hlptl..'inCblna«; lovrn-hlp 7,87 Chiui«;V.wnJl,lpB,a)i:i.1uc»; lom^ 
nn; toinnjihip 111, tSI Cblncio; townjjilp 11 a4CbfnPM. -i, -' •^••m-=Ki , lunii 



jl, 174 ObLnMo; Piuninji, 13.-, 



nnd 13.'! Indian 

dciM Cbfn^ 

Clilne.idnnJ 2SS Indl 



and 100 Indiana; towniblp 2, 11 Clilniwiand 2fi lodlann; [atrnililp 3, 4 
~'" - loiiiiiblji B, &2 ClituFid nn<l JO Indlani; loiirniblp 0, 10 Clilnsia 



d 10 Indlani; Klamalb, 33 Clilnou nnd IS Indium; LIlHrty, lEI 
00 ClilnoonndO Indiana; Soulli Fork, IM Cldnc.oand 2 Indiana; Trinidad, 



ir^-'^i '^""^X- Mllon "1» indndM 2S CT,lo 
I'^r^ate.dtaa;!"™""' '""""""■ ^""°''''' 

Jlso.; Jd 6iI^IVl|i,vV'llfi'i{?ri'rm''^l',|^B" d"^ l"",','?!'".'? Cbln-wond (1 Indian.; M 8npor(I«r'._ dlilrict. IChi 
I Ud dlatricl. 



•"■tf I*k« Bu^Ii^r'tVf 'l!lE;,if U™;!*^?.^^ Indian."; "ioiVr'Ji^ko'.Toi Cbinpro'and S I^dia'i;!;'; Uk^iiVi.fl indlan;.""l'«rt of 



(i) Noradft Counlj; Bioomnolrl 1 
ValIo>',3gi ailnciti and 4 Indian. 
ItouEb and Ilouir, ISO Chincao and 1 
- (») I'lawr Ciinnly^ Townjbip 1 aI»o inclurli> 
C!irnDB& and 1 Iniilaii; Towniiii 

■hlpO, lH7Cb!nraoaod 1 Indian, ._ . , _, ,,,, „, 

(:) I'lunuu Oounljr; Goodwin nlso Incluilm 24S CJiinojo; Indian, i7 clifncuonndBIndlnnc Mint 
Cbinosn; Quotri, 23 Cbiniau; Jllch Bar, 60 Ciilm-so; aen«^^ 73 Ciilmao; Wagblntton 143 OilntM, 

(flo) Sacr,impnlo Couuly: Alr-Wa alto incluJ™ 3 Cbiufso nnd 1 lodirm; An.criQn,70 Cl.inao and 1 Tadian; nrigliran, !a 
Clilco.0 onrl I Inillai,; CeaM. lOU Cliin«o; Consuiuucn, 103 Chlnp.o ond 7 Ind(^».; Dry Crwk.Sl Chiai*, anJ 7 Indian,; Fmuli- 
iin, 137 CldnMo and 2 Indian.; Gootclann, M7 ULint*); OranUp, 007 Cliinco nnd 1 Indian; Iko, B Cliincio and 1 Indian ' JLin.ii 
nlpni.DI Chincoi Nalnma,l:12 Gbiniaio; Saciamcnlo, 1,370 Cbinwe.a IndiaM, and 1 Japoopw; San Jo.inaln,4a Cbtnaonnd'l 
louljin ; bulli^r, lu Llilnrsi and o Inijiann. 
(W) bin DcniarJiuo Cuunlj: San BtraanilnDidJolnclDdia IB Ciiinao. 

(MjSan DIrgo Coiiiily: Fort Yuinn also InciudM 1 Clilnuo; Julian, B Chlncw; Poivy.l Cliineso; San BieeoCiW, 03 Ciilnp.j 
nnrtalndlan.; Snn Lui" Hsy, 2DIndianf. ■ -. ■ a - v, 

(<U) SinFrnnclKuCoDoly: &id Fcauriico, 1^,022 Cblncje, Hlndiuu.and BJanaacu 
(•} Orllcnduduo. 



pOPUi:ATION'o7^AiaFORNIA:ilII^OBrCIVIi:^iviSI^^ 




SOLASO. — Oontinucil. 

Vnca SUlion 

Vncavillo 

VoUojo 

HONOMA. (/) 

Annoly 

JJodegfl 

CloverJolc 

Heuldsburg 

Mendocino 

Petahimn 

BuMinn Rivor 

BaltPoint 

Santa Eosa 

Sonoma 

Vnllejo 

"W'tishington 

Goyservilie 

BTASIBLAUS. {ni) 

Brancli 

Buona Vista 

Emory 

Empire 

North 

Sun Joaquin ■ 

WasLington 



120 

SIS 

0,891 

2,374 

1,'107 

G12 

959 
2,090 
4,588 

937 
1,088 
2,898 
l,r,is 
1.114 

08 



787 
357 
843 

2,998 
223 

1,015 
281 



BrxTKB. (n) 

Butte 

Kicholaus 

Sutter 

Vernon 

Yuba 



76 

289 

4,015 

2,004 

1,000 

53B 

838 

2,417 

3,372 

877 

G40 

2,569 

957 

770 

512 

61 



597 
248 
507 
2,573 
187 
BOB 
282 



TEHAMA, (o) 

Antolopo 

Battlo Creek 

Bell Mills 

Cottonwood 

Hiin tor's 

Lassen 

Mill Creek 

Molino(p) 

Toomos'a Grant... 
Pasnkcntn 

Stoney Greek 

Payne's Creel; 

Red Bluff. 

Red Bluff. 

Tohatna 

Merrill's 



44 

54 
2,37G 



870 

407 

74 

121 

273 

1,216 

110 

448 

329 

550 

844 

80 

14 



190 
109 
336 
420 

30 
212 

49 



TBINITT. (j) 

Indian Creek 

Indian Creek 



1.859 
799 

1,075 
799 
908 

820 
199 

79 
240 

40 
240 

eo 

40 

3.30 

76 

80 

1,032 

09a 

881 

124 



783 
183 



115 

332 
6,156 

2,843 

1,367 

099 

939 

2,059 

4,422 

978 

947 

2,860 

1,371 

1,093 

645 

G5 



738 
310 
G92 

2,946 
220 

1,000 
270 



49 



1,083 
634 
776 
050 
80G 



279 
181 

7G 
190 

37 
178 

70 

"87 

315 
OS 
80 
793 
755 
592 
103 



364 
57 



270 
1G5 
299 
149 
192 

41 
18 

3 
50 

3 
02 

4 
.... ^ 

41 



TniNiTY. — Continued, 

Lowiston 

Minersvillc 

Trinity Centre 

Junction City — 

Canon Cily 

Junction Cily 

NorlbFork 

■Weavorville 

Douglas Cily 

Hay Pork Valli'y. 
"Weavorville 



230 

237 

289 

21 



419 
126 



1,208 
773 

1,025 
744 
951 



298 
189 

78 
237 

38 
208 

80 

'"38 
353 
75 
80 
943 
904 
024 
117 



613 
102 



TDLAKE. (c) 

Parmeravillo 

King's Kiver 

pBckwood 

Tulo Eiver 

Tulo Indian Res- 

ervHtiun 

Venice ■ 

Visaiia 

Visalia 

"Wbito River 

(") 



TDOLUUNE 

1. Sonora 

Sonora 

2. Columbia 

Columbia . 

3. Ohineso Cani|) 

4. Big Oak Flat.. 

YOLO. (/) 

Buckeye 

Cache Creek 

Cottonwood 

Fremont 

Grafton 

Morrilt 

I'ulah 

"Wiisliington 

TUllA. (U) 

East Bear River.- 

Foster's Bar... 

Linda 

Long Bar 

Marysvillo (c) 

Jlaryavillo 

New York 

North East 

Parke Bar 

Hose's Bar. 

Slate Rang 

"West Bear River 




G03 
524 
401 
619 
433 

4,738 
642 
303 
250 

1,191 
880 
407 




J,^rM0CMnJ.?BnS31ndlS;>i&uJoa6Cily,mCbtnc«. 
9) &,nlaCr.11 County: r»j^ronl«) !pcl"a« M Cli n«<.: f 



(j) Slakijoii County 
neao; Klnmilli,*-! Clili 
EOflCblnBonnJilnillnns; Siiiri 

(k) Solnno County: llffiicin n1 
rmlriu. 1 Clliiliae; MoDlowima. M Clil 



Uliusrc^itonwooJ.lM CliInoMnndfi Indian.: lIunil.uelOTQ^^^^^ 



.iK's i InUhin; lo>rntl,lp n. 2Clilr.™«o.ui 1 InJl"" ! '™n»J''l' 
?)Slit™C«uMy:llu..Ul<ol..c1uJc.l5SCl.in".;^^^^^^^^ 

(rt HbWvou County : lluilonl«Jncli,J«-.ua.r-90Bna3lT 

CALIFORNIA MANUFACTURES, BY TOTALS OF COUNTIES, Etc. 



,El, 
; Emiiln 

3D Chin aw; Viibn, tl 

r^'S.T.";, ^:riTn^.n-'l"i't'l;; J.'r^n:,:-..-.' "ad% InUl«,.; ■t.U^.u.^ m C1,.n.„ and =0 IndUo. 
P.) i'';'^'-''S^I "!'.ll.^.V,';J)'^l,^,U ZVlud« iil CT.in«o .nd^l^ 

" '"'■■"■" TnloTtHcr.lS Cliinc«i Vcn[cc,3 Chin«oi 

213 CliEnoo; Cbint" t>™IS <** CIiiDctoi Bif 

(t) Eicluslxo of cily ol JlBcyavillc, 



1870. 



Alameda 

Aljiine 

Amador 

Butte 

Oalavoras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa. 

Del Korte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt ! 85 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Laseen 

Lo9 Angeles 

Marin 

Mariiiosn 

Montlocino 

Merced 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa. 

Nevada 




!S£ 



455,760 

20,076 

080,250 

442,200 

284,920 

03,B5O 

86,640 

77,430 

248,422 

272,800 

496,400 

231,120 

128,700 

90,600 
301,725 

18,150 

648,570 

235,900 

208,950 

1,114,500 

43,800 

27, GOO 
133,100 

25,700 
501 ,200 



287,830 

6,185 

178,015 

144,730 

139,698 

44,817 

31,775 

10,803 

86,909 

79,000 

158,887 

61,180 

22,986 

50,000 

07,610 

1,905 

151,100 

88,250 

70,074 

358,700 

3,500 

12.180 

30,805 

8,740 

247,704 



544,592 

fl,G25 

907,394 

059,175 

104,224 

147,753 

40,694 

66,290 

254,064 

412,025 

325,259 

213,705 

GB,948 

go,882 

146,415 

11,200 

291,958 

148,380 

80,702 

412,708 

63,830 

40,345 

109,3011 

128,501 

671,101 



1,163,914 

22,752 

1,588,494 

977,937 

006,169 

262,743 

107,835 

203,415 

452,870 

520,200 

605,272 

347,488 

104,894 

251,419 

260,290 

22,400 

725,030 

322,800 

204,220 

1,000,464 

00,487 

74.02-') 

107,605 

139,510 

1,208,809 



Placer 

Plumas 

Sncrnniento 

San Uernandino. 

San Diego 

San Francisco.... 

San Joiiquin 

Siin Luis Obispo. 

San Malon 

Santa Barbara. , 

Kuala Clara 

Santa CruK 

Sjiasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solaiio 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Suttor (n) 

Tcbamn 

Trinity 

Tulare 

TiKilumnu 

Yob 

Yuba 



00 
28 

182 

20 

6 

1,223 

149 
10 
75 
24 

171 
70 
40 
42 
47 

101 

284 
13 

"n 

22 
14 
25 
103 
114 



10 


28 

4 

2 

207 

10 

3 
11 



10 
10 



23 

24 

2 

9 

6 
33 
1 




11 



12 
1 

9 



844 

112 

1,160 

104 

23 

12,377 

455 

34 
283 
105 
7CI 
704 
110 
200 
108 
308 
964 

40 

"i'ii 

50 

GO 

105 

300 

512 



844 

112 

1,091 

108 

21 

11,252 

453 

34 
281 

94 
741 
704 
119 
200 
108 
290 
944 

40 



50 
60 
105 
300 
607 



62 



14 



271,626 

148,700 

1,761,179 

75,276 

22,200 

21,170,950 

421,025 

36,990 

230.270 

170,900 

3,828,900 

1,292,550 

100,775 

304,990 

160,100 

434,200 

720.080 

212,350 

""146,000 

48,450 
58,100 
148,600 
265,526 
761,600 



101,270 

59,430 

1,107,423 

32,300 

7,007 

7.238,528 

238,470 
13,480 

105,225 
25,460 

869,026 

336,607 
37,915 
90,765 
82,209 

144,780 

328,684 
20,700 

53^00 

1G,620 

10,150 
44,480 

100,857 
207,208 



sa 



232,743 

238,041 

1,904.847 

68,583 

29,708 

20,040,321 

497,009 

47,633 
132,116 

27,948 

!, 560,726 

810,440 

77,009 
367,099 
103,071 
416,983 
740,470 
147,274 

""795! 244 
20,390 
56,445 
130.097 
285,602 
797,814 



E = 



510,595 

349.861 

3,904,010 

174,350 

67.807 

37,410,829 

1,074.^97 

07,890 

340,208 

90,007 

2,332,809 

1.646.149 

192,518 

574,875 

237,005 

811.297 

1,478,813 

218,234 

""si7[oi)i 

04,28-2 
1"5,200 
207, OSS 
035,123 
1,337,631 



19 



Tho Slato 

Alameda. 

Alpino(i) 

Amador (i) 

Dulto 

Calavcrtis (d) 

Coluiii 

CimUn Costa 

Del Norlo 

El Dorado (d) 

FrcErio 

Iliimlioldl 

Inyo 

Korn Cff) 

lilnmiith 

Liiko {A) 

Jiuaoa (i) ' 

Los Angulea 

IfariD 

MnrinosB 

SIoDaoaino (k) 

Morccd.... 

Srono [d) (0 

^[onlorcy 

Nftpii(A).. I 

Novada 

Placer 

Pliimiia {ff)(i) 

Gncramcnto 

Sun Berniirdino..., 

Sun Dioga 

Bnn Praneiico (o). 
Shh Jonquin (71)--. 
Snn Luis Ulii^po... 

Sun Mateo (u) 

Santa Bnrba Tit 

SnnlaClarn 

S:inln Cruz 

Slinstu (ij 

Sitrrn 

Siskiyou , 

Snliino 

Sonoma ....-,.,. 

Stanislaus (p) 

Suitor (ir) 

Tohnmn 

Trinity 

Tuliiro 

Tuoliimno tp) 

Yolo {g) 

Yubn 



POPULATION OF CALIFOROTA _BYCOnNTT^a AT EACH CENSUS. 



1B70, 



C00,247 



24,237 

085 
9,G82 

11,403 
8,805 
0.105 
8,401 
2,022 

10,300 
0,3SG 
O.IJO 
1,050 
2,025 
1,080 
2,000 
1,327 

15,300 
C,D03 
■1,572 
7,5J5 
2,807 
■130 
11,870 
7,103 

19,184 

11,3C7 
•j.480 

2C;8S0 

3,988 

4,9Gl 

1J9,473 

23,050 
4,7-2 
0.635 
7,764 

20,24G 
8,743 
4,173 
5,619 
6,848 

16,871 

10,819 
6,499 
5,030 
8,587 
8,213 
4,533 
8,150 
9,600 

10,851 



laaEEOAn. 



ISGO. 



379,904 



8,027 



10,030 
12,100 
16,200 
2,274 
5,328 
1,003 
20,602 
4,605 
2,004 



1,803 



11,333 
3,334 
0,243 
3,007 
1,111 



4,730 
5,521 

16,440 

13,270 
4,303 

21,142 
5,551 
4,324 

00,802 
9,435 
1,782 
8,214 
3,643 

11,912 
4,944 
4,360 

11,387 
7,620 
7,169 

11,807 
2,245 
3,300 
4,014 
6,125 
4,638 

16,229 
4,710 

13,008 



1850. 



92,507 



8,574 

10,864 
115 



20,057 



3,530 

323 

4,879 

56 



1,872 
405 



0,087 



708 

8,047 
336 



1,185 
378 



580 
660 



8,444 
1,636' 



8,351 
1,080 
9,673 



400,424 



22,106 

676 
7,863 
9,197 
7,405 
5,389 
8,271 
1,009 
8,589 
3,259 
6,025 
1,008 
2,193 
1,081 
2,626 
1,809 

14,720 
0,304 
3,364 
6,605 
2,548 
360 
9,420 
6,725 

16,334 
8,650 
3,571 

22,725 

3,004 

4,836 

130,050 

10.103 
4,567 
0,096 
7,484 

24,536 
6,582 
3,529 
4,781 
5,320 

15,870 

19,184 
6,189 
4,701 
8,106 
1,951 
4,801 
6,550 
9,318 
8,303 



1B60. 



323,177 



8,548 

" 8,252 
9,737 

12,540 
2,165 
6,185 
1,841 

15,015 

999 

2,408 



1,220 



9,221 
8,097 
4,803 
2,005 
1,114 



4,305 

6,448 

14,138 

10,819 
3,651 

21,002 
2,504 
1,249 

52,806 
9,100 
1,621 
8,086 
3,178 

11,040 
4,088 
8,805 
0,122 
0,902 
7,002 

11,687 
2,002 
3,848 
3,242 
8,370 
3,202 

14,095 
4,683 

11,582 



1SS0. 



91,635 



8,541 

16,802 
115 



10,908 



3,518 
821 

4,184 
55 



1,864 
405 



8,876 
""796 



8,G16 
335 



1,161 



048 
878 



5-18 

659 



3,-124 
'1,617 



8,288 
1,070 
0,007 



1B70, 



4,272 



81 
1 
72 
84 
31 
81 
21 
12 
182 
15 



4 

2 
2 

134' 
22 

00 


80 



10 

100 

165 
95 
2 

476 

6 

15 

,330 

223 
9 
10 
38 

173 
53 
44 
28 
29 
76 
77 
4 
81 
78 
23 
39 
67 
00 

152 



4,080 



55 



88 
71 

05 

25 

27 

4B 

277 

3 





87 
23 
DO 
8 
28 



17 

55 

156 

52 

6 

408 

10 

8 

1,176 

120 

12 

06 



87 
82 
42 
57 
71 
42 
85 
45 
30 
42 
17 
23 

160 
27 

283 



1850, 



962 



88 
82 



140 



12 
2 

105 



18 



212 



□40,310 



1,939 

8 

1,027 

2,082 

1,441 

271 

100 

217 

/ 1,682 

427 

30 

29 

143 

542 

lis 

17 

j230 

301 

1,084 

120 

186 

42 

230 

263 

2,627 

2,410 

Oil 

ni3,59G 

16 

70 

.112.030 

1,020 

59 

519 

100 

1,625 

150 

674 

810 

1,440 

020 

473 

800 

203 

294 

1,099 

99 

1,524 

305 

2,387 



34,933 



193 



2,608 
2.177 

3,057 

9 

2 

338 

4,702 

809 

37 



638 



11 

4 

1,843 

5 





17 

2,147 

2,302 

300 

1,731 



2,710 

139 







22 



415 

2,208 

615 

14 

51 

192 

2 

104 

1,0B8 

18 

1,962 



1,781 



1B70. 



7,241 



111 



40 

18 

424 

9 

764 

Q 

2,035 

70 

311 

685 

61 

28 

1 

219 

126 

34 

642 

87 

2 

201 

03 

8 

2 

5 

34 



28 

54 

5 

137 

8 

153 

12 

2 

26 



64 

140 

4 

3 

117 



I860. 



17,798 



lai 



22 

121 

1 

75 
114 

206 

6 

3,204 

153 



40 



:!,ui4 

210 

7 

1,054 
4 



411 
1 

5 

7 

108 

251 

H,028 

8,067 

41 

4 

149 

52 

SQ5 

167 

216 



61 

21 

144 



10 

060 

100 

1,840 





72 



1 
2 
8 
4 

G 
Q 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
18 
14 
15 
10 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
20 
27 
28 
20 
30 
31 



34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



(a) IncluilJnE 33 Jnpnncao. 

fil) III ISSi Alplno rrum Anmdar, Cnlnrcnu, TA Sorodd. ami Matio. 

(t) The nliiniii or ISJJU !ot Contni Cmbi and iinnia CInm vera tint on tlin tcny (□ ihc Ccnini ODlco, nnil IbMQ Tir Snn Fon- 
cisco wcro deslroj.til by (Irp. Tho conccltJ Slalp ctn*nj> oflWS glvm Ills popDlntlon of llieao lliroo counties Mfullonpi: iA.iilra 
Cusln.TISO; Siin Kmiicltca. X.IM 1 ninl Sand Ctata.mOi; unJ ^Ua lliu total i»|iuriillaii of tho tttnlu (laro £1 Uonulu, not 
nlumcil) at 2IAJ^- El Uornila wiu caCImiilal nt JO,UOU, »bicU wDiilil Dinko lliD lotal rrotublu papuUlIoa nt lliut iloto :i^,I!2. 
{Vide Doc. No. 14, Aji[kiii1Ix to Simnto Journnl, jih icsslun IiCgitlDture of California.) 



t/i IncluiUnh* 2S JupoDi: 
jgilaiaDSoiEtinUcd. 



(Ii) InlSKllJiliortgmNiipa. 

(0 In lEBU Lowi^n IroDi Pliiinu ani Sbuto. 

(i) IncludlRir^J Japnnctv. 

(i) In lEGO or(piDlicd. 

!() In lEOI uixnnlinJ. 
,n) Iiicludlni; I Ju[un»o. 
n) InclaJIngB Jn|mnc«o. 
D) In ISST San Slnlco from Snn Franclaco. 
(i) In ID51 StunlslQui fiom Ban JuDqalri uid Tnalnmui!. 



NATIVE AND FOREIGN POPULATION OF CALIFORNIA. 1870. 



Alamcdo 

Alpino 

Amador 

Biitto 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Cosla..., 

IlelNurte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

KliimntU 

Lako \ 

Laasen 

JJ03 Angales 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Meadocino_ 

Moreed 

Monroe " 

Monterey. 

Nnpn ' 

Nevada 



14,382 

485 
5,449 
7,428 
4,677 
5,088 
6,791 
1,680 
6,287 
4,074 
4,640 
1,104 
2,157 

793 
2,483 
1,178 
10,984 
8,701 
2,192 
6,147 
2,190 

306 
7,670 
5,394 
10,479 



7,332 
160 
2,561 
2,720 
2,699 
1,938 
3,140 
1.058 
2,000 
3,787 
1,074 
251 



1,060 

365 

0,021 

1,031 

1,155 

2,046 

894 

64 

4,519 

2,438 

5,070 



1,722 

57 
300 
007 
280 
261 
430 

GO 
403 

71 
823 
122 

01 

78 
102 

81 
450 
383 
128 
805 
182 

26 
441 
401 



230 

18 

878 

500 

130 

050 

310 

41 

231 

152 

182 

04 

lOG 

28 

355 

108 

412 

00 

77 

504 

204 



443 
440 
323 



15 

180 

181 

177 

64 

209 

24 

177 

37 

120 

27 

20 

24 

18 

28 

102 

214 

71 

97 

41 

10 

164 

165 

338 



442 

86 

312 

582 

122 

229 

204 

61 

305 

58 

217 

04 

64 

33 

01 

97 

222 

104 

66 

203 

02 

20 

210 

220 

611 



rOXElOM BORN. 



774 

82 
143 

280 
170: 

7o; 

142. 

25 

173 

14 

354 

36 

25 

43 

21 

46 

141 

159 

63 

306 

54 

12 

134 

103 

577 



9,865 

200 

4,133 

3,070 

4.218 

1.077 

2,070 

442 

4,022 

1,302 

1,404 

702 

708 

803 

480 

149 

4,325 

3,142 

2,380 

1,398 

on 

125 
2,200 

1,700 
8,065 



733 

30 

120 

154 

70 

lOG 

208 

11 

120 

23 

548 

71 

31 

33 

42 

15 

06 

183 

32 

310 

42 

10 

102 

114 

392 



065 

38 

409 

300 

280 

08 

549 

40 

407 

149 

180 

76 

34 

61, 

55 

41 

248 

161 

219 

106 

40 

13 

230 

169 

2,324 



2,057 

25 

490 

492 

406 
240 
723 

71 
418 

78 
383 
122 

90 
137 
171 

85 
471 
048 
222 
260 
119 

22 

441 

612 

1,800 



315 
18 
41 
08 
51 
38 

214 
9: 

128 
10 
61 
20, 
13 
17 
13 
6 
05 
04 
37 
05 
11 
4 
80 
55 

168 



1,202 

19 

326 

430 

409 

215 

802 

53 

584 

52 

136 

122 

74 

60 

45 

26 

035 

273 

146 

100 

50 

22 

160 

272 

682 



288 

7 

152 

129 

850 

20 

79 

7 

151 

33 

24 

40 

26 





317 

134 

113 

9 

18 

1 

121 

46 

237 



43 
84 

16 

35 

48 

14 

42 

12 

03 

10 

41 

8 



21 

G 

1 

28 

68 

14 

120 



Plocer 

Plumas 

Sacrnmciilu 

Sail Bernardino. 

SnnDicijii 

Snn Francisco... 

San Jonqtiin 

Snn Luis Obispo 

SanMiitco 

Santa Barbara... 

Santa Clam 

Snnta Cruz 

Shnsta 

Sierrn 

Siskiyou 

Solonn 

Sonoma 

Slanialuus 

Sutter 

Tclinma 

Trinity 

Tiilnre 

Tuolumno 

Toto 

Yuba 



0,107 
2,414 
16,228 
3,326 
3,748 
75,754 
14,824 
3,833 
3,497 
6,538 
17,241 
6,758 
2,037 
2,816 
4,321 
11,263 
15,066 
6,147 
3.940 
2,834 
1,397 
3,077 
4,182 
7,778 
6,1-14 



2,579 
887 
7,100 
1,001 
1,029 
38,491 
0,576 
2,320 
1,935 
4,302 
9,207 
3,019 
1,147 
1,305 
1,763 
4,532 
0,923 
1,884 
1,492 
1,009 
712 
1,727 
2,408 
2,809 
2,760 



051 

213 

1,645 

194 

290 
12,612 

1,149 
132 
381 
310 

1,423 
696 
197 
314 
312 

1,1:02 

1,056 
321 
254 
209 
130 
163 
265 
002 
550 



223 

91 
549 
157 
111 
664 
911 
222 

08 
225 
876 
222 
200 

00 
245 
T97 
,363 
505 
399 
278 

37 
455 

SO 
890 
230 



240 

50 

008 

16 

108 

7,147 

500 

42 

185 

90 

614 

221 

55 

84 

09 

600 

342 

107 

44 

43 

32 

16 

214 

137 

150 



100 
653 

93 

127 

1,110 

58G 

120 

92 
187 
651 
223 
180 
128 
230 
601 
623 
242 
292 
130 

01 
106 

82 
477 
366 



341 
141 

487 

23 

90 

2,050 

445 

24 

180 

112 

380 

328 

45 

172 

112 

390 

424 

154 

70 

25 

GO 

28 

249 

128 

279 



lOneiDK DOKK. 



5,190 
2,075 
10,602 

060 

1,208 

73,710 

6,226 

930 
3,138 
1,240 
9,005 
1,985 
1,230 
2,803 
2,527 
6,008 
4,103 
1,862 
1,081 

753 
1,816 

566 
3,068 
2,121 
4,707 



201 

122 

642 

32 

122 

2,307 

305 

56 

192 

06 

090 

187 

38 

221 

02 

466 

565 

94 

61 

41 

45 

39 

82 

193 

167 



649 

248 

905 

170 

98 

5,419 

635 

70 

197 

134 

796 

196 

86 

494 

128 

471 

383 

140 

114 

51 

93 

50 

380 

224 

263 



810 
287 

2,429 

78 

172 

25,804 

1,681 
101 
084 
169 

2,366 
596 
167 
400 
246 

2,443 

1,281 
817 
270 
125 
201 
71 
659 
489 
927 



104 
40 

187 

34 

36 

1,087 

123 
34 
06 
34 

163 
66 
29 
09 
35 

176 

187 
35 
50 
19 
20 
18 
80 
62 
78 



671 
150 

1,634 

85 

MO 

13,002 

1,084 

04 

258 

118 

1,007 
265 
209 
344 
241 
643 
642 
179 
240 
135 
171 
78 
389 
483 
434 



78 

09 

179 

18 

29 

i,546 

189 
33 
87 
92 

-181 
40 
61 

106 
67 
82 
84 
44 
34 
11 
37 
6 

141 
30 

102 



70 
65 
100 

3 

11 

1,170 

65 

5 
00 
13 
96 
35 
II 
32 
24 
53 
92 
71 
33 
10 
20 

5 
40 
36 
28 



,Dri<.In,not.t.lod; Ain»dor,34i ElDoiBdo.8; S^mcnlo.S; Sun Fn.acl«o, 28; BoaJoa^mn.a; Saab. 01^ I. 



-^ 



^ 



20 



CALIFORNIA SELECTED STATISTICS OF AGBICULTUKE. 1870. 



1 

2 
3 

5 

7 
8 
D 
10 
11 
12 
13 
M 
15 
Ifi 
17 
18 
10 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
31 
82 
83 
34 
35 
36 
37 
88 
89 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
4G 
47 
48 
49 
60 



Alnmcda 

Aljiiiio 

Ainudor 

BHtlo..... 

Calftvoraa 

Coliwn 

Contra Costn 

Dol Norto 

ElDorndo 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Ktrn 

Klumtttli. 

Lake 

Lusaon 

Lo3 Angoles 

Marin 

Marinosn 

Jlloiitiocino 

Morced 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napii 

Nevada 

Pliicer 

Phirniis 

Sncrnmcnto 

San Bornnrdino 

tiim Diego 

Htm I'ranciseo ....- 

Siin Joaquin 

San Luis Obispn 

Sun Mfttco 

Sanin Barbani 

Hanta Ulura 

Simta Cruz 

Shnatft 

Biorra ■ 

Siskiyou ■ 

Solano- 

Sonoma 

Stanialmia 

Sutler 

Tehumn 

Trinity 

Tulate 

Tuoluinnu 

Yolo 

Tuba 



Acres. I Dollars. 
178,601 10,747,770 



12,365 
41,684 
187,985 
41,000 
223,337 
273,100 
9,877 
73,823 
24,530 
89,851 
4,' ■' 
0,066 
3,800 
17,608 
37,S5S 
234,883 
247,186 
24,184 
r>2,043 
474,756 
0,190 
150,201 
38,539 
7,074 
71,067 
06,131 
318,669 
7,129 
10,963 
3,792 
428,061 
467,846 
44,626 
40,026 
168,316 
38,852 
22,332 
13,204 
66,674 
360,636 
402,026 
389,239 
107,966 
185,390 
2,307 
85,028 
18,736 
807,159 
79,281 



55G 



tiS; 



82,800 
486,400 
2,423,300 
221,245 
4,403,064 
4,936.636 
166,950 
072,285 
629,705 
1,244,775 
148,520 
839,650 
09,850 
718,100 
297,800 
4,245,885 
5,632,313 
840,500 
1,364,643 
2,324.112 
84,300 
6,150,208 
1,998,190 
608,760 
994,200 
441,610 
6,052,100 
191,242 
782,602 
6,817,400 
7,874,365 
1,800,673 
8,397,701 
6,823,963 
12,022,722 
1,870,800 
324,970 
170,950 
724,755 
10,170,758 
10,079,183 
4,302,840 
2,-072,288 
1,353.815 
78,550 
812,900 
296,365 
8,720.686 
1,350,827 



Dollar B. 
2,310,062 
105,490 
863,983 
1,446,591 
889.388 
2,011,830 
1,421,895 
00,617 
498,443 
229,069 
657,212 
157,221 
192,925 
117,949 
316,928 
205,385 
939,859 
1 625,171 
095,330 
616,373 
754,769 
88,822 
1,640,107 
609,846 
371,605 
1,203,275 
380,051 
2,674,109 
133,140 
160,920 
816,761 
4.376,675 
767,715 
1,190,793 
847,902 
2,700,125 
381.195 
299,628 
180,230 
567,573 
3,170,536 
2,509,718 
2,718.036 
918,417 
880,234 
88,825 
818,910 
268,256 
8,022,366 
906,224 



DollaTS. 
1,119,485 
264,700 
280,687 
851,856 
401,60'J 
1,872,859 
053,346 
65,888 
449,439 
680,010 
727,660 
228,308 
419,125 
78,756 
814,210 
364,241 
1,177, 
1,898,556 
239,571 
676,257 
1,428,876 
107,150 
2,036,652 
850,160 
181,270 
341,770 
542,346 
1,504,770 
151,530 
645,277 
280,355 
1,692,119 
1,559,818 
745,543 
947,840 
1,487,076 
319,375 
206,119 
116,285 
880,365 
1,532,995 
2,178,096 
1,382,913 
611,798 
908,047 
04,478 
1,104,817 
284,196 
1,288,494 
673,927 



A'o. 

6,947 
500 

1,686 

4,316 

1,781 

6,906 

7,033 
394 

2,096 

8,074 

4,329 

1,514 

1,685 
284 

1,984 

2,022 

9,652 

2,671 

1,110 

4,405 

2,302 
723 

8,017 

1,756 

786 

1,767 

1,440 

9,462 

970 

5,687 

Oil 

14,130 
4,485 
3,238 
3,777 
7,926 
1,729 
1,473 
464 
4,654 
6,862 

10,616 
10,137 
4,754 
3,069 
185 
4,500 
1,283 
8,789 
3,104 



No. 
647 
16 

141 
272 

76 
670 
658 

37 
120 
263 
460 

98 
163 



175 
01 

635 

115 

112 

483 

601 
82 

403 

311 
21 

107 
186 
628 
109 
723 
1 
776 
469 
359 
33d 
270 
101 
167 
641 
462 

1,046 

1,110 

1,139 
334 
267 
23 
270 
203 

1,206 
288 



A'o. 
3,663 



No. 
36 



1,471 

2.330 

1,095 

2,666 

5,866 
707 

8.809 

1,009 

6,091 

783 

028 

"372 

1,827 

1,791 

2,408 

18,055 
923 

8,431 

872 

646 

0,370 

1,128 

1,148 

1,563 

8,405 

9,060 

622 

1,268 

3,169 

6,990 

4,813 

5,140 

2,165 

7,558 

2,168 

1,207 

887 

2,631 

4,123 

14,960 

2,271 

3,023 

2,157 

426 

2,039 

1,681 

3,688 

2,909 



68 
56 
01 
14 
23 
88 
188 
437 
282 
110 
118 
83 
72 
48 
48 
244| 
117 
143 
119 
101 
139 
97 
24 
69 
220 
106 
10 
839 
1 

50 

01 

269 



lltODCCED. 



18 

508 
7! 
48 

114 
43 

392 
17 

100 
11 
80 
54 
48 
53 
63 



No. 

46,692 
67,165 
28,914 
76,864 
85,214 
176,063 
26,650 
067 
17,887 
139,677 
12,060 
521 
90,200 
17 
10,307 
703 
247,003 
2,067 
18,442 
49,880 
46,525 
101 
208,877 
6,006 
504 
26,596 
12,042 
113,304 
13,121 
16,448 
1 
70.889 
191,909 
6,635 
189,858 
49,085 
819 
3,520 
402 
12,844 
41.890 
68,38 
118,400 
35,073 
130,808 
130 
147,801 
80,117 
83,087 
12,640 



No. 
4,042 

216 

5,380 

19,242 

8,178 

33,540 

7,679 

1,859 

4.123 

15,616 

10,060 

088 

753 

1,057 

11,647 

1,657 

5,702 

6,606 

8,577 

18,109 

9,054 

669 

13,062 

6,243 

1,137 

7,421 

1,342 

14,749 

1,006 

1,683 

425 

27,937 

3,310 

5,829 

3,947 

8,135 

3,403 

11,155 

437 

7,499 

17,133 

28,588 

14,693 

10,090 

19,459 

871 

15,408 

4.266 

20,855 

13,947 



BmheU. 
854,888 
1,294 
16,678 
746,102 
8,341 
701,174 
925,054 
7.423 
8,997 
10,765 
32,284 
13,629 
13,700 
2,360 
87,010 
12,904 
12,210 
67,S80 
4,275 
06,639 
218,162 
0,144 
744,003 
264,240 
685 
102,402 
16,212 
126,135 
10,350 
32,947 



BuslieU. 
27,288 
308 
86,760 
16,490 
4,585 
2,830 
280 
505 
■ 681 
8,930 
10,022 
22,015 
3,576 
1,506 
11,015 
206 
454,896 
320 
466 
0,878 
14,456 
325 
3,570 
10,190 
306 
1,000 
190 
62,280 
12,260 
9,330 



BiiahcU. 

69,080 

8,113 

130 

0,140 



67, 
208 



137,0^ 

2,175 

690 

2,375 

3,894 

36,497 

268 

297,744 

300 

120,971 

760 

4,173 

21,411 

3,780 

190 

2,510 

03,474 

10,910 

60 

260 



2,360,925 

38,864 

107,049 

20,200 

1,188,137 

115,687 

29,569 

7,794 

116,107 

1,949,418 

018,425 

1,650,725 

073,749 

404,722 

9,898 

63.605 

21,920 

2,025,612 

147,347 



37,350 

25,982 

278 

168,374 

13,084 

22,795 

2,455 



3,167 

3,750 

145,792 

15,700 

26,513 

625 

795 

9,760 

137 

2,140 

33,245 



600 

780 

294,318 

511 

15,134 

56,090 

2,227 

8,260 

131,383 

5,442 

323,961 



4,160 
3,801 
1,460 



40 

1,320 
27,867 



BtLtlicls. 
008,976 
8,209 
51,816 
839,098 
37,396 
386,408 
358,360 
2,550 
8,642 
18,875 
-81,907 
4,905 
20,270 
550 
07,946 
93,926 
153.080 
37,765 
8,135 
64,670 
142,436 
i2,704 
681,116 
34,890 
200 
57.261 
10,345 
589,613 
61,906 
18,745 
600 
1,027,016 
120,601 
171.207 
187,871 
405,575 
72,155 
54,030 
10,416 
65,138 
443,400 
193,456 
632,950 
452,911 
108,323 
735 
85,110 
7,995 
499,926 
270,271 




dmux FnDDDcn. 



B 



Pounds. 

198,910 

57,290 

43,700 

24,445 

06,357 

37,677 

158,986 

85,863 

215,530 

6,000 

112,580 

20,940 

3,150 

6,275 

84,268 

69,494 

25,836 

2,107,755 

8,290 

02,692 

232,530 

8.5.686 

423.385 

50,860 

60,741 

72,126 

234,725 

439,835 

21,510 

11,528 



Pound*. 

430 

50 

950 

3,000 

8,545 

600 

64,890 



27,691 
400 
850 



200 

03,340 

1,700 

8iKI 

381,300 



1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
1!1 
22 



292,060 

156,340 

285,460 

81.088 

179,075 

120,055 

30,150 

39,200 

95,800 

119,909 

1,060,266 

52,625 

117,875 

08,185 

8,820 

87,490 

26,760 

186,929 

100,6'.'5 



330 
229,208 
4,1110 
713,6601 23 

24 

l.COO 25 
850 1 26 

27 

8e,i';"n' i'8 
7.WI0, -J:* 
2,300 liO 
31 
25,111 
341,259 
469.295 
84,600 
525,:i90 
120,225 
2,190|B8 

I 39 

2,300 

4,000 

246,900 



200 

200 

350 

18,750 

8,280 



• BKUBcUoa cf.prliie" ■""! "«1°"'" ■'""""loia Iho ™iurD. ot«UL.lfrum O-tiforait^ 




M^. 



Map Number One 



CALE 50 Chains to an Inch 




R rt w 



SEE PAGE 



34 



l:^ 







residence: of L. W. BUCK. 

/•liasahts viLLtr. SoLttio Count!, Gal, 




K-» 





44 .'/ '■ , I 



ScAug_ 50 Chains to an Inch 








I / 



26 



C u r r ^ 

04O A 



S£yj ^ 



5 b ^ 



■^- - 





Ji . c . c 



'*.? 



^DS. 



M ^. 






%, 



'^OSTEJcf/// h 
•S/A52 'X^ 



\x^y 



•UOA 



H Majmtt 



yr 



,i' 



ji ffrlifftiJ- ! / . \f ^ 






c*^ ■• 54- ^/^TSCV* 



Jff 



jr<f/'4/«' «/" 



'fiO-rf I^V 



V/t V 



.n.^ 



3S 



if-OA 






leo^ 








Malhj 



■ J ftark^ 



CH 



'Ira, ft art 



4oa ^ 



JI 



n pri 



r / ■ * o ft. 



t^^- 



;?£' 



16 -^- 



Jrt nt X en. 

, $ — - 









J rtiier'30n ' 



/f,ir ^-oiAtn. 



I r 



W**yil''i'a.Uo„tjh 



J. 



SJtO A. 



-'*■ 



Zf. >*. 



a^tf.^ 



- /" 






^ JJ U.I t o n 



n 

fe.o ^ 






■.n^ 




KM 

feojt 



ICuh I. 



,.'2 5 



*■' 




K \ t60~d 

z ^ \ ^ 



A/" C 



(fOW ./ 



D 



i^ 



J' (irf i I' f 



•fff 



i? 



\».i 






S'f-O ^ 



JI. 






I' / ' / --f 




'^ 



/> 



^^ 






<S. /f 




J/'* 






B 




J. 'II I 




— — ir 



460^ 



CaJ 




Co. 



320^ 



V 




25 



:r Ji Co. 

320 A 



-V 



!■*'. 



'*• /> ^ 



M 



jji:- ", 

CnJvrr- 



J^ppt'n i/rr 
Sltiixfjtf 



SCH 







A. BuinM\ 
■fSOA ,'j 

i 



-I 
I 






^■y.'.f 



-1 : 

+ .... i 



Ca.t.J'-.K- R ■ Co- 

MOA 



A Jt 



J t II rl e 



fu u L 



'V rij tf ct K f 



*—h 



J n 3 e f* h M' 



Westtrn I'uC- 
H H. Ci> 



D 



I I c 



28 



.-.*-^'" 



___J) +4-D- 




29 




NUMiEB_TiJEE 




■^C ii 



SEE PAGES 38 a39 




;s2 







INFIRMARY AT rAIFFIELD, SOLANO COUNTY, CAL 



'-^ , 




{Residence of W.J. PLZASANTS .Tleasants Valley, Solano Co.,Cal. 




Residence OF FRANK WILLI AMS,Yacav,lle, Solano County.Cal. 




aOBiRT M.,.'. ffr.,»r«rE ft UND/^G, Memi La^oi^g. Solaho Cou.ir, C.uro.s.A, 



R^,ozHc. r>f L.B.MIZNER. RFNICIA . Solaho Co-.Cl 



;ES 26 a 27 




ScALESO CHAIh4S 



AN 



NQH 



).> 



Il.l'if'-r 



lOuA. 






imA. 



.7. 



III! A 




\Vi',stPfn 

|[ 
I'at'itif 

Ji.H.rv 

• 040.1 



ItiuA . 



64hA. 



04O A. 



^-i. 






ami 



•if ft 



■^5 2 



.-__§. 



CP. 

moA.. 




r& 









I'ltintnifr 
pp J.'iliA 



f-lt.P.i'esL' 









fb/jrt 

/tJoA 






G iVLrtior'e 

'2 7 ; ^ 

Ctrul ('otiLUllTLlJ 



M9 C 

34 

9SOA. 






QED 



find- 







■-. y 



^•^ i 



GWA. 



SSaD 
tooA 



Vn-iversify 

24 ^ 

6-/OA- 



iVf.stPf't/ 

25 
Parilic 

B40j. 



Gdji.n'' 



.isoA 



320A 



4.UfsrSn\ X ,.,,■■_ 







B@. 



■^ 3SoA 




proa:inent aUILDINQ&\ 


I 


M.E. CHURCH 


2 


OATHOUC CHURCH 


3 


OAMPBELLITE CHURCH 


4 


VAC A HOTEL 


s 


HURLEY HOUSE 



J 

2fOj 



■HiA. 

■SCJl. 



J.Ctthi 

I60A 



n.T.riant 

.r.:oA 










O 

im.l. 



^eil. 






If,-'"*- 

liuiA . 







T? TT -p. 



a. p s\ ""^ 




















R nr :e 




-■,<B^«^^j^.«JH< '^ ^^'< ; j%-?^^'^**^^ 





Residehce & Grounds of J. W.JONES ESg., B£NICia.Solano Co.CAUfomiK. 




Residence of D. L. MANJV, Dixon,Cal, 



Residence of W.B.TOWSON,vacavill£, Solano Co^Cal. 





STDOWNtGS MONASTERY, Bviim.SoiANO Co^Cal 



U.D. TfSDALES fiesioBic£,Suist}ii.SaiAMO Co..C4l. 



.•»t*M A p Number. RV-i 
















// " \. 



CcAMn . 



t^'Jnt.n- SCE PAGES 



* D B£ fT A 



hcm' 





KeynJ. \ SoA 
__ If/A 



Xutrramn I f. 



> 



■ ::; 



U4A 



rrv 



1 



^* ^ w^ ^SCA l-g 40 C H jUN S _T0^ AN INCH 



.ii» 



./ w.'Sof ■* 



(k 



o^.'/Vl 



J-Mf^anti 






«»x j a- 




tf rtfJ2»wi/rt-|_~" /^ 



■i^n^n i 






J-F.O.vffoorl WCw^^-^r/ 






/J7^ 






;/: 



ij '". 



■ ^ i - • 



i 



_ a».rf ^ 
4. ■StAbtea' ■+ -' 



John .Wf/f/' 
JilJ 



-- .>v 










'if- - 



X. Kdmoml.v 



2iS 









I) a rife/ Mr /'f-ary 



< I ' O « 



r j^mAz 



■-Oil) *j^"^ r-lci73 .- 



~— ^ J^lMo r't: i s 






--^^ I ^1 









■■'■-/ //■/,■... 

■ t- • - - - - r. 




S\vu II ef 






33 



i.^:^ 



iS 



>r^^£M^UMtKiy '- J- :r"~-T^: ^'--tsi.O MM' hint 




lln.iltuufX 



H 



■mf<^^ 



( its 



^^^^^•^ ...'//^^tii'Ki^^ 



,^ ; . IPiP:^! 



C/3 






(337)^ _^ LiaD— 



tuirt _ _ 




/re^T 



■1 ' 'h /-''hiA 



nuzn 










---^ \ 











J5l 



^^oA^'J-^- 












II w. 



/ 



SEC P A G- E 



^.. li. w. 



A 
















ro 



Ml A P MUM B E R SIX 



SEE PAGES J4 




R. II W 



SjJAiNs TO A N Inch 




44 




M? 



Map Numbe r Seven 




JVAT^A 



_ tie JO hmwfti 

"^ii'i.u I ■ Jiiifttut%eiiietit 



C O 'U^^T Y 



I — L- 
I 








::^rX^ ^ /• 



J/. /Ue^e 







> 



^ & v^ 



5^ 









Jit.vJiV/.sofi 



:S ;i 



^ 







J^e.^TiJk}' 








^ - T ^S 



^^^^TKA ro^^^^ 



p 




r' . / // 



tt* 




Map Number 



SEE PAGE 46 




,/ 




.i\ 




A' 



.<>^^ 



N 





v' 



%f 




\ 



VALLE JO 

SOLANO CO. 

CAl., 
KKiii /■;, I („ „i, hull 



1 



y 





yudvjo Lun^/ and jfiLi-ow imni Cunuuiu,, 

j/^ . ..' 




-TM 3T ' 



--(*;■ T7 



'.L-^O-Sr OFFICE 
>f..., l^X-^JTY HALL 

y^''^nu7 \^ . ^^f^'TfST Church 
,. •V'fiiu.^ii: \ 4 \ PBFSB^ Church __ 

5 I Public schoo~l__ 

6 I Bernard house 

7 I HOWARD HOTEL 
S\ GRAIN WAREHOUSE 
9 I UPPER DEPOT 
to \ LOWER DEPOT 

STARR MiLLS 




^ 






OF V A L L K J o 




^^^ii 






if: 



i 




r ' 



11\ 




-* , ,- 



.]^ir-,T^ .1> isl M A T{ E 

O I, lU iJ 



I S L A N I) 



/> 



-/ 



A 




4 

lllll'fitlk'l 

LJ ^ 



/ 



V 






\ A N ■>• 



''^ ./ > 





V K I) 




THC RT RtV. V/.INGRAHAU KIP. D.D LL.O CX-OrnciO PRCSIOEItT 
THERT ff£V. J.H.D.WINGFICLO.D.D LL.O. VICt-rfr£SID[»T &TREASURER 
Mff.SAMUU C-GlfAY. SECIfECTAtiy. 



ST AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE,BENia A, SOLANO CO.,CAL. 




J! ti liiamiiAU H.f.iiii'.U D.fntsjoim 
J H Vtmoiirto LL D. Vici P»<swiH< 
Hi/, ont'. J ttiinv iicHiiAiir^ 



STMAffV of THE PACITIC, Bcnicia. Solano Co-.Cal. 




ffOi Si/ifreu, DtL. 



5T 




ji . SproitL 



Oreeii Valley Roa.g^ 



57 





■ 




€ 


t, 




n 


u 


/c 


3 




1 







^. 


4 


4 


e 


e 


72 


II 

1- 


"I S '. 7 



t 



1 

_ 


a 


a 


s 


s 


ff 


'.. 


// 


/O 5 


J 


7 



EMPIRE 



.L 1 


7^ 





'1^ 




? 


i 


5 




« 


" 


10 ? 


,, 









J 


■4 


J 


: 




a 




M 












^^ 



E,.st «/' 
J.Jia/ijtlian 
ffjl 



J.BJTout 



MiiTio- Miller 



G.W.JTaLL 

1\A 



1 


s 




a 


.': 


r. 


IS 


: 




9 


r 


1 



r 


_ 


J J 


* 


fl 


lA 


(r 


'0 


P 


' 


7 



TEXAS 


/ z 


-' A 


r « 


U Jl 


«*' , 


■1 



J 


- 






5 


6 


u 


i; 


W * 


S 


7 



_ 


X 


T 


S 


f 




1 


ri 


70 


9 


i 


7 





ST.- 



1 


£ 


J 


J 
* 




« 




a 


„ 


B 9 


J 


L 





i/.-iT. CjrRe/t- 




m 



:M 



COZrjt T HOUSE 



1 


7. 


■1 


J 


S S 










_ „ 


I& 


II 


1/> 


9 


J •r 



MISSOURI 



^^ ' JJi 



/ 


3 


■^ 


« 


J 


[5 




IE 


" 


1^ 


9 


J 


7 





ST 



K 




' 


.' 


e 


c/) 


-TT^ 




r- 


' 








rj 



CO 




' 


J 


t- 


f 


- 


"a 


" 




^ 


/ 



1 


£ 




J 




J' 




e 




13 


tl 




-1 




3 




9 





PTZBZrc 



1 


2 


\ 


* 


ff 


6 


m 


" 10 9 d 


^ 



ST 



SplTARE 




^^E- 


e 


f 

i J 

-- - 


J 


rf 


ft 


1 


^. 




t " 

_l_ 


"1 


.f 


' 





/ 


J 


.1 


.< 


f 


« 






'I 


It c 


3 


J 

_J 


^ 





7 


C 


a J 


1 




J 


" 


K 


7 




f 




5 










^' I mum A 




f(ESIO£NC£ Of A.C.HAVfKINSJSBOACRESJ EiUIRA TP.SOU 




Ainu 1 1 I [ 1 1 1 1 i.ua 



^^R^: 



- *. . - •*«>:a**-»»***.4«**JuE,4^^i.*l^^«^-^^ . 



^^'<'»».>glA^ »»aliJ».ajH^^ ,,^; 



1-1 




f^lSIOeNVi Ut JOHN S t>IAYtS.OIA0N,.-,,^n, 



,^_ 03 







65 



BUSINESS DIEECTOEIES 



OP THE 



CITIES AND TOWNS OF SOLANO COUNTY. 



'^AE«£«S<J^O ■FO'WSTSSX^. 



lun. 



BSSIDIBdB. 



ArniBlJong, T ■ 

Austin, Ira 

Bnrnes, D. O 

Bunas, B 

Blivpii, H 

Brownleo, A. J 

Browno, J. M 

Urowiilee, John 

Brown, Siimuul 

Butler, O. H 

Cullender, John 

Currington, CiUvin. 

CiirLur, D. B 

CitrliT, WillUun 

Clark, Anson 

IJolemnn, Iticlinrd.. 
Connolly, Henry.. . . 



Vnllejo.. 



SoulU Vallojo 

Vulleio 



NnprvKoad 

Vnllcjo 



Soutli Vnllejo 

Valkju 



BDBIIIES3. 



Visa 



Corcornn, 3 

Crocker, H. T 

Diimulh, N 

Dnniol, Louis 

Dare, Jobn T 

Dnvis, EdwariJ 

D-iunonboiim, S 

Daweon, John 

Deninger, P 

Denio,F. M 

Driike. S. S 

Dunlup, W. n 

Dwyer, il. H 

Farnhnni, John 

FBSsolt, J 

Frisbie, Elcazcr 

FrUbic, John B 

Frisbie, L. C 

Gore, Robert 

Gorhiim, George.... 

Grady, C. 

Greenwood, G, H.., 
Greenwood, George 
Grove, Charles 

Gunning, A. H 

Huggerly, Patrick. 

Hall, A. S 

HuUin, C 

Harrier, D. W 

Heald, J. W 

Henderson, 0. L... 

Hii'hborn, Alei 

Hobba, Isnac 

Hots, J. JI 

Howard, A 

Irving, Juracs 

Jackson, B. B-...- 

Jacobs, C. S 

Jefferita, P. E 

Kennedy, J. E.... 

Kimball, S. P 

Kitij;, W 

Luwion, J- G 

Loach, Frank A... 



Nnpa Boad 

Vailejo 



Machinist 

Farmer 

I'lnning-inills 

Dry goods, etc 

Groceries 

Parmer 

Physician 

Cashier Vallojo Bank. 

Butcher 

Tailor 

Livery stable and undi^r- 

Farmur [taker. 

Grain denier 

Fiirnior 

Heal estate dealer 

Clerk ■ ■■ 

Livery and wliolesale 

liquors- 
Farmer 



Maine 

Canada 

Now York...... 

Gtrmnny 

Ireland 

Scotland 

N, Hampshire. 
Scotland 

EnjiCland .... 

Maine ..-■ 

Pennfylvniiia.. 

Ireland 

Canada 



South Vnllejo.. 

Vailejo 

South Vnllejo.. 

Napa Boad 

Sulphur Spring 
Vailejo 



Wtiln 

CIDB 



IOST.DFFJOE, 



18C0 I8G4 
1855 1 1655 
1850 18111) 
18G0. iBia 
186711807 
18G4 1854 
1857; 18G9 
1852' 1852 
1867|l8(;7 
18*0!184'J 
185211852 
1849 1851 
1857 1667 
18571 1857 



Vnllejo. 



Mnssaebusctls. 
Maine 

Ireland 



1852 
1862 



IW. 



Sulphur Spring 
IVallejo 

Nana Boad 

Vnllejo 



Rd. 



South Vnllejo. 
Vailejo 



South Vnllejo. 
Vailejo 



Vnllejo 

South Vailejo 
Vnllejo 



Nana Road. 
Vailejo 



Wiuta and liquors 

Cnlholic pastor 

13()okkoeper Star Mills.. 

Nurseryman 

Dry goods 

Tailor 

Brewer ■ 

Machinist 

Fanner 

Carpenter 

Jusiico of tho Penoe.... 

Clothier 

Sail mnker 

Collector 

Banker 

I'hysician ■ 

Farmer 

Machinist 

Soda-water manufacturer. 

Farmer 

jSlock raiser 

, Butcher 

1 Architect 

"^"ood and coal dealer 

Engineer Star Mills 

Grain dealer ■"-■■■ 

Farmer 

Mochinist 

Carriage maker 

Machinist and boiler 

Capitalist [maker. 

Druggist .-- 

prop- Sherman House 

Shipwright ■■■ 

Contractor and builder. . 

Machinist 

Shipwright 

Boots and shoes ■■■ 

Shipwright 

Purmer 

Attorneyat law. 

Newspaper publisher 



Maine 

Now York 

Ireland ..■■■ 

New York 



1852 
18G2 

1853 
18G1 
185811863 
18uy!l8GS 
,185711357 



1853 
1 860 



Ho. ot 



170 



600 



520 



21 



KIVE. 



Germnny 

Ireland 

Germany 

Massachu sells. 
N.Hampshire, 
Massachusetts. 

Maine ■ 

Massachusetts. 
Sow York 



Ireland 

Maine 

Ireland 

Maine 

Masaachiisells. 
Pennsylvania.. 

England 

Ireland 

N. Hampshire. 

Maine 

New York 

Maine 

Now York 

Pennsylvania., 

Maine 

Connecticut.... 

Massachusetts. 

Maine 

Pennsylvania.. 

England 

Maine 

Ireland 

Massachusetts. 



1860 
1860 
1859 
18G0 
1851 
18G0 



Miehiean... 
New York. 



1850 
1864 
18511 
1863 
1364 
1847 
1847 
1850 
1850 
1849 
1864 
1862 
'188'J 
186,} 
1868 
18G5 
18G0 
1865 
185^1 
18G5 
1860 
1868 
1850 
18G8 
18C8 
1870 
1845 
1856 
1856 
I8G2 
1849 
1853 
1854 



1868 
1873 
1869 
18C2 
1853 
1862 



1861 

1864 

1862 

1868 

1872 

184!) 

1649 

1850 

1851 

1849 

1809 

1862 

18T1 

1868 

1808 

1870 

1871 

18CII 

1864 

1866 

1862 

1868 

1852 

18G8 

1868 

1870 

1865 

1858 

1856 

1865 

1861 

1856 

1854 



11 

800 



11 



150 
640 



100 

11 

80 



1852 1807 



10 



Lee, B 

Lutson, Thomas 

Longan, E 

Lyford, J. S 

Lynch, P. B 

Mathewa, Thomas.. 

McCool, D 

McCoddcn, James.. 

McDonald, T 

McGellignn, Edw... 

McGill, T. F 

McCue, Palriuk 

Mclver, J. E 

Michnelis, P 

Sliller, R 

Moore, W 

Morgan, Thomas.... 

Mudgolt, E. S 

Murphy, Charles .... 

Murphy, P. J 

Ncato, John 

Nelson, "W. C 

North, John 

O'Brien, T.E.&Co. 
Parkinson, T. A.... 

Piorson, J 

Plaistcd, G. r 

Powell, A 

Robinson, A. T 

Root, "W. C 

Ross, David 

Sargent, W. J ■ 

Smith, Thomas 

Snow, H. K 

Souther, J 

Starr, E. T 

Starr & Co 

Street, A 

Sullivan, E. F 

Times Pub. Co 

Tohin, J.F 

Topley, James 

Tormoy, "William... 

Vailejo, F 

Vailejo Sav. and 

Com. Bank 

Vailejo City "Water 

Company 

Voorhces, A. P 

"Wallace,! 

Walsh, P. R 

"Ward, B. S 

Widenmann, Cbas.. 

Williamson, D 

Williston, J. E 

"Wilson, E. J 

"VVilson, Joseph 

"Wilson, John 

Wilson, Henry 

"Wilson, Robert 



Vnllejo.. 



RESIDISOB. 



Napa Koad 

Vailejo 

11 

„ JI. IlousQ, Napa 
Vailejo [Road. 



Benicin Koiid 

South Vailejo.... 
Vailejo 



BDilBESS. 



Navy Yard 

St. John's Mines.-.. 

South Vailejo 

Vailejo 



Civil engineer 

Machinist 

Lumber dealer,... 

Groceries 

Farmer and hotel 

Saloon 

Wood and coal 

Wines and liquors 

Brewer ■ 

Painter 

Stage proprietor 

Machinist 

"Wines and liquors ... 

Farmer 

Groceries and liquors 

Engineer 

Attornoy-nt-law 

RigEO'' 



HiiiniT. 



Whin WiiB 
unu CAma 



Mnssochueelta. 

Maine 

Ireland 

Ohio 

Ireland 



New York 

Ireland 

Pennsylvania. 

Ireland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Ireland 



POSMFPICB. 



Vailejo. 



South Vailejo.. 

Vailejo 



Benieia Road 

Vailejo 



South Vailejo 

Vnllejo 



Ho-ol 
lens. 



160 



1870 



Supt. St. John's Mines . 
Mfr. iron wind- mills.... 

Groceries ■ 

Furniture dealers 

Ship builder 

Retired 

Auctioneer 

Lumber dealer 

Clothier 

Lumber dealer 

Farmer 

Sail maker 

Boots and shoes 

General merchandiso 

Engineer 

Wholcaalo groceries, etc. 

Plouring-mills 

Foreman machinist 

Wines and liquori' 

pub. and job printers 

Butcher 

Apothecary 

Groceries and liquors 

\""„,l. Physician 



England 

New York 

Nova Scotia.... 



Maine 

Massachusetts. 
N. Hampshire. 
Pennsylvania.. 
MassachuBctts, 

Maine 

Pennsylvania.. 

Maine 

Ireland 

N. Hampshire. 

England 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts. 
Ireland 

Ireland 



140 



"Wonniger, Charles. 



California 



Vailejo Township... 

Napa Road 

Vailejo 

Magnolia Nursery.. 

Bonicia Road.,... 



Banking 

Water supply ■■ 

Clothier and mer. tailor.. 

Machinist 

Wines and liquors 

Foreman 

Brewer 

Retired 

Wholosolo grocer, wines 

Mining [and liquors 

Farmer 

Wines nnd liquors 

Fruit, and ornamental 

trees and shrubbery, 
prop. Retreat Cottage 



New York... 

Maine 

Ireland 

Now York.. 
Germany.... 

Scotland 

"Virginia 

New York- 
Ireland 



Prussia. 



1000 



esfb 1870 

ostb 1669 
1862 1862 



1847 
1862 



1860 

1865 



GREEH VAS.E.E-r TOWNSKI 



Baurrelon, Alexis... 

Blhler, Henry 

Bluke, Joseph 

Bamber, John..- 
Brown, Henry... 

Brlen. John 

Burrell, Thus 

Ciiok.Geo 

Corcoran, Daniel ... 
DcCarlow, Francis. 

Durbin, M. L 

Durbin, W. Perry.. 

Ebor, L 

Gillajipy, J. C 

Green Valley School 
J. H. Humphrey I, 
Clerk 

Hatch, A. T 

Herbison, William. 

Huston, J 

Uulton, Fred.„. 

Jume», JamoB H.... 

James, Mrs. Urpha. 



Green Valloj' 

Bridgeport 

Suisun Valley... 

Bridgeport 

Green Valley.... 
jSuifiun Valley.. 
Green Valley.... 



Bridgeport 

Green Valley... 



Suisun Valley.. 
Green Valley... 



Bridgeport. 



Wine grower 

Butcher 

Farmer 

Ilotcl proprietor 

Wine grower ■■■■ ■• 

Farmer and bincksmitu.. 

' nnd slock raiser. 

Wine and fruit grower... 
Farmer 

Blocksmith and mnch'st 
Farmer ■ ' 



Fruit grower 

Farmer 



Franco 

Germany 

Vir«inin 

England 

N.Poundland. 

New York 

England 

IruTaod ■ 

Spain ■ 

I California 

Missouri 

Gornmny 

Kentucky 



RE3IDtK0B. 




1860 1800 
1854J1800 

1850 1851 
1868 1808 

1851 1862 
1866 1866 

1849 1849 
1868 1871 
18U1 1872 

1850 1860 
1848 1860 
1846 1851 
1853 1870 
1864 1804 



Cordelia. 



Suisun,.... 
Cordelia . 

Suisun..-. 
Cordelia. 



Suisun.... 

II 

Cordelia . 



Indiana 

Canada 

Ireland 

Now York 



^dHtookraisor... I Tennessee^ 



1857 
1865 
1801 
1862 
1840 
1868 



1870 

1868 
1867 
1868 
1860 
18631 



Vailejo... 
II 

Cordelia. 



109 



Jones, F. B 

Lynch, Mrs. Mary. 

Maekay, "W. G 

Martin, Samuel 

Mason, Wm. W.... 

Moisler, Mrs. F 

Morris, J. B 

Morrison, J. Z 

Neitsiel, F 

Picreo, Lewis 

l'ittman,Mrs. C. J. 

Ramsey, Wm •■ 

RockviHo School, 
A. T. Hntch.CI'k 

Rogers, C.....— • 

Schult7,, 0. As Co,... 

Stilts, Marion 

Valentino, J. H....- 

Volypka, John 

Wilson, Curtis 

Yoakum, J. E 

I Yoakum, Wm 



Groon Valley.. 



Bridgeport 

Grcon Valley.. 



Rockville 

Green Valley.. 

Bridgeport 

Green Valley,. 



BUStlESS, 



Bridgeport.-... 
Green Valley.. 

Bridgeport 

Green Valley.. 



Winegrower,. 
Farmer 



Carriage mnker nnd feed- 
mill 

Winegrower 

Parmer 

Blneks'hnnd wagon mkr 

Retired ■ 

Prop. " Cordelia House 
Farmer ■ 



Slono euttor 

Wine grower 

Farmer and stock raiser. 

Painter 

Wine grower "'V^;' 

R,R. & exp. agl. tS: J. 1 
Farmer ■ 



iinvni. 



via Via 
cuDi ami 
IsSuta UOd. 



Vermont 

Ireland..,. 

Scotland 

Pennsylvania. 

Mnasacbufiotts 

Germany 

Missouri 

New JcrBoy.,, 

Gorranny 

Maine 

England 

Pennsylvania. 



England, ... 
Germany... 

Missouri.,., 

Austria.... 
Illinois..... 

Missouri..,, 
Tennessee. 



1853 
1869 
1860 
1849 



1858 
1867 
1855 
1854 



1849 



1872 

1860 
1846 
1865 



POSt-OFHOL 



1858 Cordelia . 

1859 

1868 

1860 



1858 
1857 
1872 
1864 



1860 



Suisun,-,. 
Cordelia . 



Ho-tf 

300 

80 

1100 

255 



100 
275 

800 
100 
660 
110 

46 



1876 
1860 
1846 
1866 
1856 I 1850 
18494860 
1865ll806 
1866 1868 



Suisun.... 
Cordelia. 



118 

700 



880 
6 



373 



66 



VACgAVIS-I-E 



^TOWNSECSI*- 



Adock, D. W 

Alien, ilorgan 

AlliEon, J 

Anitmin, C. N 

AnderBon, 0, W.... 

Bubb, ThfiraiH 

Bufbuur, NolliuaR. 

Bnrker, Ida 

IJufi^fi.rd, J. M., Jr. 

Biiiclior, IVm 

BfcrH, H. M 

Uimnoll, n 

Bin(,'hiiiii, 

15ril!B'. J 

Brinck, H. & Wm.. 

Wmck, L. U 

Bolcrd, John.... 

Brown, O. 3 

Broughton, N. L... 

Biiok, L. W 

BurgcflB, L. D 

Burton, H 

BiirWn, n. E 

Diliihun, J 

CnlmofB, Win.. 

CHnU'lou, Wm 

Chrleto|ih(!r. B.F.., 

ClilFmun, F. H 

Coburn, Gilbort 

Coburn, G. O 

Collins, J. R..... 

Corn, D. K 

Crciglitun, David.., 

CunninL'Uiifn, J 

Diiviii, Isaac P 

Decker, Mrs. I. L.. 
Deckor, Solomnn.... 

Dobbin!., W. J 

Doinn, J 

Donnldaon, J 

Downoy, D. M 

Dunn, H. C 

Dotton.Diivid D..,, 

EvorBol, J[irnc!i , 

Evcreul, Licnry 

EllioU, J. SI 

Ftiro, TUomna, , 

Giirdnor, J 

Garrett, B 

Godfrey, J. E 

Griidy, Ktichnel 

Harrington, Jubn.. 

Hawkins, D. G 

Uorold, Dott 

Honcli, D. E 

Hubbard, J. W 

Huckins, Jolin 

Hurley, V! 

Hul^bin^on, A 

Jogger, Williain... 



UStDDO. 



liTITITI, 



Lacoon Valley 

Allendale 

Viicoville 

Gib9un CuRcin B'd.. 

Vncuville 

Fleiuonts' Volley... 

I'utah Creek 

Lugoon Valley 

Vttcasille ..... 



Gibson Canon R'd, 

Putali Crook 

PleoianU' Valley.. 
Viicftville 



Viicu Volley 

Viicavillo 



Vaca Valley 

Vucavillo 

Plcasiinla' Valley, 
Vaeavillo 



Farmer- 



Fruit grower - 

Farmer and fruit grower, 
Frnit grower 

Fanner ■ 

Fruit grower- 

Farmer 

Fruit grower ■ 

Parmer 

Fruit growers 

Farmer ■ 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 



Viico Valley. 
Vocaville 



Missouri 

JNcw Turk.-... 

Ohio 

Illinoi' 

Now Tork 

I England 

jCalifornia 

Now York 

Ohio 

KentucUy 

N. Hampshire 

Mi^ouri 

Prance 

Missouri...... 

Now York 

Now York 

Missouri 

Englond.... 

Ireland 

Missouri 

P. Edward Isl. 

Tennessee 

Pennsylvania.. 
Ohio 



Vactt Valley 

Vacaville 

Pleasants' Viiltey. 

Vaca Valloy 

Vucavillo 

Plensantii' Valloy. 
Vacavillo 



Sulsun 

Vaca Valloy.. 

Vocaville 

Vaca Valley.. 



Vacaville 

Lagoon Viilli'y.... 
Pleasants' Valley,.. 

Viiea Valley 

Vacavillo 

Gibson Canon R'd.. 



Fruit grower 

Prop, livery stable 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 

illotol proprietor 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Farmer 

Fruitgrower 

Former 

Salesman 

Furmor 

" and stock raiser. 



U£UUJ loCo. 

18Sl,18o7 

1850: 18S4 

I8o5l8.J7 
187Gjl875 

1857' 1863 



post-omcs. 



1850 
1850 

18(10 
1855 
18.52 
1850 
1873 
1853 
1854 
1803 



1850 
1850 
18C1 
J85G 
18G1 

leuo 

1871 
1855 
1855 
1867 



Vneaville..... 

Allen dale 

Vacavillo 



Winlcn.YoloCo 

Vaeoville 



IVinton.YoloCo. 
Vocaville 



Fruit grower.. 
Farmer 



Fruit grower.. 

Farmer 

Fruit grower.. 
Furmor 



Pennsylviiniu,. 

Kentucky 

Ciinodo 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Kentucky 

Ireland 

Kentucky 

Pennsylvania.. 

Cnlirornin 

MassacliUEUtta. 
Ohio. 

Kentucky 

Illinois 

Pennsylvania., 

Indiana 

Ireland 

Mnssaohuautts, 

Virginia 

Missouri 

New York 

Mnssachusctls 

Ohio 

Maine 

Missouri 

Pennsylvania. 



1874 

1854 

1808 

1874 

1800 

1811!) 

1840 

1854 

18C0 

1801 

1808 

18-40 

1864 

I8G:> 

1853 

1874 

1853 

1853 

1850 

1854 

185L' 

1858 

1851 

1840 

1855 

1855 

1807 

1857 

1805 

1857 

1870 

1857 

1805 

1852 

1875 

ISuf 

1850 

1852 

1870 

1854 

1873 



1874 

18S8 

1870 

1874 

1871 

1807 

185S 

1875 

1804 

1801 

1809 

1857 

1804 

1802 

18G2 

1874 

1854 

1855 

181)4 

1857 

1853 

185B 

1851 

1855 

1850 

1856 

I8f4 

1857 

1671 

1801 

1S70 

1858 

1805 

1852 

1875 

18001 

1R70| 

1850 

1870 

1859 

1873 



K<L«f 

Icm. 



040 

800 

400 

80 

20 

3D 
370 
840 

80 
2258 

60 
850 
111 
300 
125 
840 
100. 

300 

100 

40 

05 

li5 

60 

60 

800 

140 

]20 

75 

100 

280 

13 

120 

200 
IGO 
loOO 



100 
200 
382 
100 
120 
140 
300 
100 

640 



50 
820 

3D 
100 
124 



tat. 



anusioi. 



Jipsoo, W 

Kippey, S. E 

Korns, Levi 

Laycock, James 

Lewis. H. Howoll... 

Long, S. W 

Long, Sirs, T. J 

Long, Meyer Jos... 
Luxerno&'NVilson.. 

Marshall, R-C 

Slaurfeld, T 

Slartel, Charles 

SI'Cune, J 

Merchant, J. B 

SliUer, St. R 

Mize, T. J 

Moore, Arthur 

Nay, Somuel 

Parka, J 

Parks, Robert ■ 

peao, Dcmetrio 

Poiia, John I 

Perdue, John 

Piorson,Mrs. M.... 
Plott, George N.... 

Plott, J. W- 

Pleasants, J 

Pleasants, W. J.... 

Poiser, A 

Powell, Jame.1 

Eobinson, J, B 

Robinson, J. M 

Snxton, J. B 

Seamiin, Henry 

Schroder, H 

Scoggins, D. G 

SraiiTi, Ed. S 



Vacavillo 

Voca Volley. 

Vacavillo 

Vaca Valley. 

Vacavillo 



PloosflnU' Valley. 

Suisiin Bo.id 

Vacavillo 

Pleosanls' VftHey. 
Vacoville 



Vaca Valloy 

II 

Vocaville 

II 

Voca Valley 

Gibson Canon R'd. 
Vacaville 

Pleasants' Valley.. 

Vaca Valley ■ 

Vacavillo 



BUSHES, 



Farmer. 



Fruit growor 

Farmer 

Farmers and stock raisers 

Farmer ■_ 

General morchandiso 

Fruit grower. 

Farmer 

Blocksmith and ag. imp.. 
Fruit grower 

Fruit grower- 



Farmer 



Fruit grower.. 
Farmer 



Vaca Valley 

Vacaville 

Piitah Canon 

Gibson Canon It'd. 
Vacovilli! 



Smith, John 

Stark, J. V 

Stevens, A 

Stevenaon, A. M. & 

G. B 

Theodore, A 

Thissoll, G. W 

Thurher.E. K 

Tilaon, J. D 

Torres, J. R 

TowBon, W. B 

Walker, S. C 

"WHlernion, B. F.... 

■Welldon, J. A 

Weldon, Mrs. Mary 

"Williams, J. R 

■Wells, J. N 

Wollakill, J. B 

Wolfskin, J. R 

Wolfskin, s 

Worsham, E. W... 
Woir, James G 



Voca Valley 

Gibson Canon R'd. 
Vacoville 



Pleosantfl' Volley.. 

Vacoville 

PloflEonts' Valley.. 

Vaea Valley 

Suisun Road 

Vacavillo 

Voca Volley 

Viicuvillu 

Viica Valley 

Piitnh Creek 

Vacoville 



iiiimi. 



VUb via 

mat cuDi 
tsSlsU Co Co. 



Ohio 

Kentucky 

Pennsylvania. 

Ohio 

Missouri 



FcnnBylvanio. 
N. Carolina.... 

Ohio 

Greol Britain. 

Fronco 

Irolaad 

Cnnuda 

Virginia 

Missouri 

Ireland 

Now York 

Kentucky 

Call Torn ia 



Kentucky.. 

Ireland 

Now York.. 
Kentucky.. 



1858 
1853 
1852 
1801 
1857 
1867 
1857 
1849 
1849 
1852 
1862 
1850 
1863 
1859 
1849 
18S4 
18-10 
1868 
I8G5 
1850 



KST-OmCI. |[«. of 
laa. 



1804 
1857 
I860 
1802 
1857 
1857 
1857 
1853 
1851 
1858 
1870 
1850 
18G3 
185Q 
1851 
18G4 
1853 
18B1 
1806 
1857 



Vacaville. 



Fruitgrower 

Former 

Real estate 

Horlicullurist 

Pa.'^tor Boplist Church.... 
Fruit grower and slock 

" [ruiser. 

Farmer 

Druggist 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Stock raiser 

Props. Vaca Val. B. R. 
General morehondiac.... 
Fruitgrower 

Druggist 

Frnit grower 

Farmer 



Fruit & vegolablo raiser. 

Fruit grower 

Ftirmer 

Carpenter 

Fruii growor ... 

Former 

Prop. Union Hotel 

Fruitgrower 



1851 1856 
1860 1801 
187311873 
18501854 
1849 180O 



New York 

Slisfouri 

lUinuis 

Kentucky 

Ponnsylvonio., 

Prussia 

Germany 

Missouri 



Kentucky 

MussQcbusetts 

Kentucky 

Frnnce 

Ohio 

Rhode Island.. 
Virginia..., 
Kquador — 

Morylond 

Kentucky 

Missouri 

Wisconsin 

New York 

Mossachnsells. 
We=t Virginia 
Missouri 



Kentucky . 



1640 
18G6 
1S59 
1850 
1853 
1853 
1852 
1850 
1850 
1864 
1860 
1860 
1853 

1840 
1864 
1850 
1850 
1850 
1850 
1851 
1853 
1800 
1853 
1853 
1857 
1871 
1838 



1850 
18G5 
18GI 
1801 
1854 
1873 
1850 
1872 
1867 
1873 
1872 
1600 
1850 

1850 
1870 
1855 
1857 
1865 
1850 
1854 
1853 
1870 
1853 
18.53 
1858 
1871 
1841 



Wlnlcn,Yu1aCq. 

Vocovillo 



Wlnlen.YuloCo- 

Viienville 



Wiiilors.ToloCo. 

Vneaville 



1838 1841 
1838 1841 
1872 1873 
1807 1868 



Winlor»,VoloCu. 



Vocaville 



94 

125 

66 

80 

640 

IGO 
650 
130 

320 
lOO 
2 
380 
40 

111 

80 
120 

2200 

850 

100 

90 

80 

120 

040 

640 

00 

lUO 

3002 

2070 

33 

Z'lO 

2 

160 

BO 



900 

175 
300 

86 
250 
847 
100 

80 

72 
125 

50 
SGOO 
5000 
080 

40 



sxx.vsiT'vsXaX-E: ^ oinr sr s :k z ^. 



Silvoyville 

Dixon 



Silvoyvillo 

Dixon 

II 

Silvoyville 



Dixon 

Silvoyvile 

Diiun 

Silvevville 



Dixon 

II 

Bolftvia 

Dixon 

Silvoyville 

Dixon 



Silvoyvillo. 



Anderson, Fred 

Bank of Dixon 

Barnes, T. B 

Bornivrd,W. M 

Bcnighuff.S. K 

Bliiko, William 

Blum, Sons & Co.... 

Bronlon, R, A 

Brinokorlioff, John. 
Brinkerhoff, Isaac,. 

Buckles, A. J 

Bukles, Mary D 

Casey, J. & Co 

Church, E. C 

Cooper, George 

Coleinon, N- B. S... 

Cotton, J. W 

Coulter & Bayley.., 

Curroy, Robert J.... 

Dailey, Samuel 

Darling, A. W 

Dasbion, W. A 

Dovenport, Joel 

Dudley, J. M 

Duko, E. D 

Emory, John 

Bppingor & Co 

Evans, G.U 

Fleming, C 

Fruhm Bros 

Francis, E 

Frederickson, John 

Padyen, J. W 

Garnell, J. S.. 

Hull, Riohord. 

Hall, William 

Hammond, Robert.. 

Hamilton, J. T 

llanke, H.... 

Henning, Slarx 

Binman, W. S 

Hobmon, V. J... 

Hull', D, B 

. Button, Edward 

Jansen, C 

Juhiiaon, J. O 

Kaslen, A. J 

Keiskcr, William... 
Kelly, K. B.... 

Kirby, A I " 

Kline, Joseph Silveyvillc 

Loako, Ed. B I " 



Wba' 
cuna 
USUli 



Farmer 

General banking 

Constable 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

General mercliandiao 

Sheep raiser 

Farmer 

" and stock raiser... 

Attornoy-at-law 

Farmer 

General blacksmi thing.... 

Farmer 

[broker. 

Stock reiser & real estate 

Real estate broker 

Warehouse 

Farmer 



Dixon 



Bntavia 

Dixon 

Silveyvillo Town., 



Dixon., 



Germany..., 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

New York 

England 

Now York 

II 

Indiann 

Pennsylvania.. 

New York 

Arkansas 

Kentucky 

Illinois 



Roodmostor 

Livestock dir. and com. 

Capitalist [merchant. 

Farmer 



General morchandiso 

Physician 

Live slock dealer 

Giiy Hotel 

Engineer 

Slorcbontond farmer 

Farmer 



Silvoyvillo 

Dixon 



Saloon 

Stock dealer 

Boot and shoe maker 

Farmer 



Silveyvillo. 
Dixon 



cimt 
laCt, 



1855 1870 
csth 18T3 

1856 1800 



California 



1854 

1864 

1832 

cstb 

1852 

1850 

1852 

1875 

1871 

estb 

1865 

1855 

1853 

185 

estb 



Vermont 

Maryland 

Now York 



Georgia 

Now York 

Tennessee 

Sweden 

Germany 

Ohio 

Denmark 

N. Homjiahirc. 

MisEouri 

Irelond 

Now York 



Canoda.... 
Germany., 



Botol nnd livery 

Hotel keeper 

Lumbar dealer 

Barber and hair dressor.. 

Former 

Blacksmith 

Bookkeeper 

Furmor 

Attorn ey-al-l aw. 

Druggist and apothecory. 

Parmer 

E. R. Tel. and oxp. agent. 



New York 

Bavaria 

New York , 

Dis, Columbia 

Germany , 

Indiono 

Missouri 

Germany 

Illinois 

England 

Pennsylvania, 
Missouri 



Dixon.. 



1808 
1804 
1809 
18G0 
1802 
1852 
1852 
1875' 
1871 
1876 
1805 
1855 
1869 
1857 
1808 



Bolavio 

Dixon 

Biitavio 

Dixon 



1870 
1849 
1849 
1853 
1857 
1808 
lestb 
1860 
1851 
OS lb 
1863 
1855 
1855 
1853 
1853 
1853 
1802 
1804 
1853 
1862 
1850 
1807 
1807 
1854 
1661 
1854 
1872 
1853 
1871 
1807 
1850 
1859 



icm. 



Balavio 

Dixon 



1855 
1870 
1860 
1855 
1850 
1867 
1808 
18GS 
1870 
1858 
1809 

1803 Bntuvia 

1858] Dixon. 
1803 



Blttnvia. 
Dixon.... 



1850 
1864 
1864 
1802 
1800 
1853 
1802 
1802 
1870 
1807 
1800 
1801 
1850 
1872 
1808 
1871 
1807 
1800 
18G0 



300 



160 



160 
040 
600 

130 

320 
1500 
1000 

18 
040 
100 

10 

BOO 
320 
164 



80 

100 

4500 

880 



80 
OGO 
160 



IGO 



160 



820 



KIIIE. 



Leiijh, A. B 

Little, S.G 

Longmirc, Daniel.. 

Love, J. R 

Slack, Darius 

Madden, John 

Monn, D. L 

Martin, H. B 

Mayes, John S 

McBride, S 

McComb, .Tunics 

MicCuiie, H. E 

McFadgen, J. W.. 
McKinloy, Geo. C. 

McSIaater, C. H 

MoMahan, S, G 

MerryQeld, J. C 

Munion, W. A 

Niroad, George 

North, J. C 

Ohnimus, L 

Poltcrson, Robert. ., 

Parish, J. D 

Peterson, Henry..... 

Peters, Peter lif 

Porter, James 

RndclilTo.S 

Riddle, D. R 

Ross, H.A 

Scliroder,Joochim.. 
Schirmer, Charles,.. 

Silvoy, Edward 

Steele, William 

Storey, A. B , 

Slrauh, William...., 

Stuart, A. V 

Stuort, J. K 

Stuart, D. S..,,. , 

Suinmors, A. G 

Sutphen, A. W 

Swayzo, Elom , 

Sweany, John 

Tale, William 

Timm, Potor 

Tyler, S. G..... 

Woihe, Edward..,, 
Welch, D. T 



Dixon- 



Silvoyville. 

Dixon 

Silvoyville.. 
Dixon 

Silvoyvillo., 

Di-icon 

Silvoyville.. 
Dixon 



Butcher and cattle dealer. 
Farmer and stock raiser., 

" andcorpenter 



Saloon 

Former 

Livery and feed stable. 
Fiirmcr 



Silveyvillo. 



Wells, William H, 
Wright, Gilbert..., 
Wymon.W. U 



Dixon 

Silveyvillo 

Dixon 



Silveyvillo. 

Dixon 

Silveyvillo. 



Dixon 

Sweeney Creek 

Silvoyville 



Dixon. 

Silvoyvillo, 
Dixon 

Silvoyville, 



and engineer. 



Horse trainer 

Bricklayer 

Till wore and stoves 

Carriage painter 

Former 



Tin and stoves 

Farmer 

Frin. of Dixon Schools... 
Proprietor Arcado Botol 

Farmer 

House, sign, and carriiigu 
Former [painter. 

School teacher 

Fruitgrower 

Farmer 



Dixon 



Wines, liquors, etc., 
Furmor 



Physician. 



Coshicr Bonk of Dixon,., 



siimn. 



New York 

Sliissachusctta. 

Indiana 

Canada West. 

Indiana 

Virginia 

N. Hampshire. 

Missouri 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Slichigan 

Missouri 

N.Hnmpshire. 

Illinois 

SI nine 

Missouri 

Now York 

Maryland 

England 

Pennsylvania.. 

Now York 

Vermont 

Gormony 

New Y'ork 

England 

S. Carolina 

Missouri 

Germany 



California... 

Ohio 

Missouri.....', 

Germany 

Sloine 



Virginio 

Illinois 

Canada 

Missouri 

Tcnnciiee... 

Germany 

Now York.., 

Prussia 

Ohio 



Kentucky, 



Mossochuaolts. 



Vtfn 

UBII 
Ll£UU 

1852 
1852 
1854 
1802 
1854 
1852 
18G0 
1863 
1850 
1853 
1862 
1654 
1855 
1862 
18ii3 
1841 
1850 
1802 
1860 
1809 
IBGG 
1863 
ISSO 
1869 
1858 
1360 
il852 
1867 
1870 
I8G6 
1804 
1862 
1851 
18S0 
1859 
1800 
180O 
1801 
1805 
1875 
1875 
1860 
1850 
1859 
1854 
1650 
1808 

1840 
1803 
1804 



fflsn 
ami 
WCo. 



1852 
1855 
1854 
1867 
1857 
1862 
1860 
1860 
1850 
1853 
1664 
1854 
lliaS 
1850 
1870 
1850 
1857 
1802 
1874 
1869 
1870 
1863 
1800 
1859 
1858 
1857 
1802 
1875 
1870 
1806 
1807 
1852 
1857 
1650 
1860 
1802 
1802 
1862 
1800 
1875 
1875 
1862 
1800 
1804 
1854 
1871 
1803 

1868 
1868 
1806 



Dixon.. 



AUeiidolo 

Dixon 



Ukioh, Men, 

docino CO , 

Dixon 



so.cr 

kaa. 



3 
1500 

59 
100 
154 
000 

700 
300 

4600 
160 
240 
10O 
718 
320 



320 
100 

1600 

118 

19S0 

318 
100 
100 

680 
620 



IGO 

400 
040 

100 

172 
lOO 
150 



160 
320 
460 
100 



s^xsTirxv ^o-^xrs^xx^. 



67 



mh 



Alt''". *'■■;■■■;; 

ilium'iiii J- " 

Hirlwiir. Nalhun... 

Bsfii«, 0. E 

JlMHl, h. J—- 

[ferry, Uoo. M 

Ilojiiton, H •■■ 

ilreck, Sftmucl 

Uroriiun, H. C 

llrooka, N, C 

I'liscy, Michnol 

ChundliT, T, H 

illiri-lBr, A i 

i:!iilJ',C. W 

i.'tirisler, P.J 

Cliivrce, Joseph 

l.'lnrk, It. Jt 

Clayton, D, J 

C^hlsn, 0. R 

Colo, Jesse 

Connolly, Edward. 
Crator, Riuhard,... 

Uiinn, AloJt 

Dickie, A. A 

Dwisun, W. G 

Dunby, Job. B 

Bllaworlli, Geo 

Bdwaras, J. G 

Edmonds, Nicholas. 

Fannon, Thos 

FoHL'K, Uornlio N.. 

Qiddinge, SI. H 

Qillcspio, Geo. A... 

Uiiilo, &. C 

Eulo, Ditvid 

UDrmnn, A. M 

Ucndorson, Henry.. 
Hondorson, Tlioinns 
Ucivitt, JosQph 
Hillwrn, E. P.. 
Uojl, Jrisepli... 



Suieun Vulley 

Suisun Townaliip... 
Suisun Valley 



BOinSCE, 



Suisun 

SuiBun Tnwti6hip... 



Farmer 



BiTIVlIT. 



cimi aat 
loSIaUl It Co. 



Cnrpciitcr... 
Bliicksniilh. 
Farmer 



Suieun 

SuiBun Township... 



Gcncriil niorchandiac. 
Fiirmer 



SuiBun. 



Suisun ViiUoy 

Siiiaun 

SuiBun Towiiahip... 
Suiaun 



Suiiun Township... 



ijuisun 

Suiaun Township... 



Suisun Valloy., 



Suisun Township.. 

Suisun 

Suisun Tawnabip.. 

Fnlrflold 

Suiaun 

Suiaun Valloy 



County Recorder 

Livery stjihlo 

Supt, Public Sclioola. 

Insurance ngcnl 

Farmer 

Lumber dealer 

Farmer 

Attorney- at-i aw 

Former 

Miller and larmor.... 

Farmer 

County Surveyor 

Farmer 



II1iiioi$ 

Ireland 

Germany 

New York 

Mnlnc 

New York 

Illinois 

N. Hampshire. 

Mli'Iiignri 

Conncctieut-... 

Ireland 

Now York.. 



British N. A... 
Mnasacliu-eils. 
Kentucky . 

Illinois 

Missouri.... 



Blacksmith.. 
Farmer 



FuirBold 

Suisun Township.. 



" and sheep raiser... 

Saloon keeper 

Farmer 

Prop Brooklyn Hotel.... 
Juatico of the Pcaeo.. 
Farmer 

Sheep raiser 

Farmer 



Suisun. 



Hovl, J. B 

n.."xiL., B, F 

Uublmril, Henry.... 
Hughes, Slielmel..., 

Huteliinson, M 

Korn.a, J. W 

Loomia, C. S 

Lemon, J. B 

Lang, JatiicB 

Lamont, Geo. A 



Fairfield 

Suisun 



Fairfield 

Suisun Township. 
Fairfield 



1852 



18G4 



New York 

Misaouri .- 

Canada 

Ohio 

Virginia 

New York 

Kentucky 

Ireland 

Pennfiylvania.. 

Maine 

Pennsylvania. 

MisEouri 

Tennessee 

Micbigan 

N. Hampshire 
Indiana 



" and stock raiser... 
Commission merchant.... 
Farmer and agent for S. 

C. Hastings 

Parmer and sheep raiser. 

Saloon keeper 

Justice of the Peace 

Laborer 

"Warehouse keeper 

Fruit store 

Marshal 

County Treasurer .^.. 

Farmer 

Attorney-Bt-law 



Now York. 
Maine 



1857 
18<in 
1846 
18II3 
1858 
18r,:S 
ISM 
184 !l 
185!1 
1847 
1856 
1858 
1862 

I8r,i 

1802 
1805 
18G0 
1850 
1 872 
1805 
1852 
185-2 
le.'iO 
18G0 
1852 
1850 
1851 
184!) 
18.)4 
1855 
18G3 
1854 
1850 
1849 
18110 
1852 
1803 
1852 
1833 
1851 



N. Hampshire. 

Vermont 

New York 

Conneclicul... 

Ireland 

Maine 

Now York 

Massachusetts. 

Indiana- 

Ireland 

Ohio 



1857 

1850 

1847 

I86« 

1858 

18G» 

1857 

1851) 

1859 

1863 

1855 

1802 

1856 

1870 

18S2 

1874 

1863 

1852 

1872 

1865 

1869 

1856 

1850 

1860 

1852 

1874 

1854 

1850 

1854 

1388 

1874 

1860 

1852 

1859 

1860 

1853 

1854 

1856 

1863 

1863 



Suisun . 



POST-nmoi. 



1853 1872 
1851 1852 



1854 
I84!l 
1BG4 
1852 
1801 
1849 
1849 
1852 
1854 



1854 
1856 

18C4 
1858 
1864 
1859 
1852 
1857 
1864 



Ncbot 



440 

480 

175 

1320 



96 
307 

278 
820 
207 



SO 
520 

100 

150 
167 

500 
40 

TOO 

154 

6000 

84 



510 

100 

!)61 

64 

84 

15 

420 



8200 



20OO 
3000 



Lambert, G. S 

Miirria, Samuel A . 

Miller, Jolin 

MilcK. J. L- 

Miihel, F 

Melbourn, Thnc 

McMullun, Jubn.... 
ItluKenna, Joseph... 
Mclnlirc, Jnhn 
SleCreary, Dun'l.... 
Mathesun, E. D 

Marston, J. H 

Newton, A 

Palmer, S. G 

Palton, M. J 

Perkin?, E. D 

Prpslev, Jas. P 

Price,' J. W 

Quick, "Wm 

liceves, Co. P 

Itocvcs, W. W. R... 
Rice, Thos. B. 
Ricbardeon, J. li... 
Bobbins, R. D 



Suiaun 

Suisun Township... 
Bnisun 



RESIDESDI. 



Suisun Ti'Wnship... 

Suisun Valley 

Suiaun 

Suisun Valley 

Suisun Township... 
Suisun 



Suisun Township. .. 
Suiaun 



Suisun Valley. 
Suisun 



Robcrls, M 

Rush, U. F 

Scarlett, ^y. W 

Sheldon, W. C 

Sheldon, B. N 

Silva, P 

Smith, Sampson 

Smithorj, John 

Solta, W. K 

Staples, E. H... 
Staples, F. 0... 

Stockman, D. SI 

Swan, Thos. 31 

Taft, Geo. "W 

Taylor, W. H 

Tisdale, H. D 

Trninor, James 

Turner, \V. H 

Vest, John 

WellH, J. T 

"Wendell, J. P 

White, A. L 

Whitley, Geo. T 

Wolfskin, M 

Woods, John 

Wolf, Wm 

Yost, E. K 

York, Wm 



Polrero Hills... 

Suisun Valley,. 



Suisun 

Suisun Township... 



BUStEBSS. 



HitniTI. 






Blacksmiihandmachinial 

Parnier 

IJakery 

Farmer 

Boot ond shoo maker 

Farmer 

Farmer and fruit raiier... 

:Vllornoy-at-law 

Farmer _ 



Miller 

Farmer 

P. M., Etationer and news 

Tcncbor [dealer 

General merchandise.. 

Physician 

Stone mason 

Farmer 

Mi!rebnnt 

Sheep raiser 

Tinner 

Revenue Collector 

Pres't Suisun Bank aad 

lumber dealer 

Prop. Roberta' Hotel. 
Farmer 



Illinois 

Tennessee 

Germany........ 

Tennessee 

Belgium 

New York 

Ohio 

Pennaylvanin. 

Ireland 

Pennsylvania. 
Nova Scotia.. 

Maine 

Konlueky 



Suiaun. 



Suisun Valley.... 
Suisun Township... 
Suisun 



Suisun Township... 



Fairfield 

Suisun 



Prop. Premier Hotel 

p-armor 



Oregon 

Canada 

S.Carolina.... 
Maryland .... 

Ohio 

N. Carolina.. 

Miaeouri 

New York.... 



Maine 

Ireland 

California . 
Indiana.... 
Ohio 






1852 

1857 

ism 

1850 
186C 
1858 
1857 
1855 
18,52 
1854 
1807 
1653 
185(1 
1853 
1670 
1861 
ISUU 
1852 
18M 
1862 
1862 
18-53 
1660 



1865 

181)0 
1850 
1867 
1856 
1857 
1855 
1858 
1854 
1868 
1853 
1800 
1853 
1870 
18G1 
1869 
1858 
1854 
1802 
1802 
1804 
I860 



Suisun 



Clerk Court Houao. 
Capitalist 



Portugal 

Ohio 

Kentucky 

Pennsylvania. 
Maine 



Druggist and slalionory... 

Attorney-at-law 

Livery stables. 

Drug store 

Farmer 

Carriage maker 

Farmer 



Dop. SherifT, 

Dlatrict Attoraoy 

Undertaker 

Mason 

Farmer and stock raiser. 

County Asseaaor 

Cashier Bank of Suisun., 

Livery stable 

Saloon keeper 



New York 

Kentucky 

Vermont 

Iowa 

New York 

Ireland 

Missouri 

Ireland 

Missouri 

Maine 

New York 

Missouri 

Ohio 

Germany 

Ohio 

Sweden 



18G0 
1856 
1852 
1862 
18-54 
1854 
1852 
1849 
1852 
1853 
1860 
1850 
1857 
1850 
1868 
1852 
1853 
1859 
1852 
18,51 
1856 
1854 
1868 
1853 
1850 
1849 
1869 
1850 
1 1867 



1800 
1850 
1854 
1862 
1854 
1854 
1800 
1851 
1802 
18-54 
1860 
1800 
1857 
1850 
1868 
1876 
1853 
1860 
1852 
1809 
1856 
1669 
1860 
1869 
1850 
1860 
1870 
1861 
1807 



Io.or 
lEia. 



160 

90 



820 
20 



156 
700 



156 



60 
640 
640 



800 

5100 

286 

8 

86 

75 
912 

1000 
1270 

116 



46 



240 

320 



150 

1066 



ssxirsaxA ^o'wxvs^x^- 



HIME. 



Aerden, J. H 

Andrews, James H. 

Barbaires, Pelix 

Barker, W.T_ 

Barry, John J 

Barry, James 

JJenicia Araenal 

Blake, W 

Brown & McKay... 

Brown, T 

Campbell, Anthony 

Camden, Thos 

Campbell, S.R 

Clayton, W 

CyroB.E 

Dcming, C. B 

Dean, B.W 

De bo It, Joseph 

Dillon. P. W.- 

Fay, James T 

Fornee, A 

Fiaober, Geo 

Fiacher, J 

Folsoni, Myrlck 

Foreman, W. H 

Garetfon, John 

Glover, A.J 

Goodyear, Andrew. 

Grace, James E 

Grant, J. 

Gore, John._ 

Hagen, E. D 

Haggerty, J 

Buaiings, D. N 

Hayman, J 

Huughton, C. B.... 

Hutlon, P 

James, D. C 

Jones, J. W 

Kaiser, W 

Kintirv, T 



Bcnicia. 



Bl'k 89. 
Bcnicia. 



Bonicia,. 



BEI3IIK3. 



Catholic priest 

Blacksmith 

Waterman 

Farmer 

General merchandise 

Stoves and tinware 

Tanners 

Farmer 

Laborer andbd'ng house 
Farmer ■ 



Bcnicia Road.. 
Benicia 



Dillon's Point., 
Benicia 



Benicia Arsenal.. 



Bcnicia 



Butcher 

Hotel proprietor 

Dry-goods, etc 

Master workman 

Engineer 

Parmer 



iimin. 



N5.0f 

IcrtL 



Contractor and builder , 
Parmer 



Butcher. 

Farmer.. 



Belgium 

Massachusetts. 
France 

N.Hampshire. 
Ireland 



Ireland 

Missouri 

Ireland 

Nova Scotia ... 

Illinois 

Missouri 

N. Hampshire. 

New York 

Ohio 

Ireland 

Maryland 

England 

Gcrmony 

SwitKerlund.... 

Now York 

Slasaachuselts. 
II 

Now York 

Connecticut 

Tennessee 

Connecticut..., 

Ireland 

New Jersey..., 

Ireland 

MoBsachusetls. 



BenicinTownsbip. 

II II 

Benicia 



Lumber dealer 

Farmer ■ 

General merchandise. 

Parmer 

General merebondlse. 



New York.... 

Missouri 

Maine. 

Prussia 

Now York 




8600 
100 



Kramer, H 

Lauhead, James 

Lord, J. McO 

McAUistcr.J 

MeDonell, A 

Mizner, L. B 

Monroe, John 

Mooney, W 

Moore, J. J 

Morrison, C 

aicDonell, E. A 

Nicholas, Mrs. M... 

O'Donnell, Thoa 

Perino, W 

Poor, George 

Quigg, Chas 

Riiidell, G.H 

Eose, E. L 

Eueger, John 

Ryosson, P 

Sage, T 

Sisicr M. Joseph..,. 

Sister Louisa 

Smith & Sfooney.... 
Spencer, Kobert E.. 

Stevens, G.W 

Stevens, J 

Stone, J. C 

Stringer, C 

St. Dominic's Mon- 
astery 

Thompson, P 

TuUle,H 

Von Phister, E. H„ 
Vaughn, Singleton.. 

Weinman, F.P 

Williamson, D 

"Williams, J. 31 

Wingfleld, J. H. D. 
Wood, W. F 



Bcnicia 



Bcnicia Arsenal.. 
Benicia 



Benicia Arsenal. 
Bcnicia 



Farmer 

Cooper 

Farmer ■•• 

Lieut.-Col. U. S. A 

Express agent and P. M.. 

Atlorney-at-law 

Parmer 

lilucksmith 

Farmer 

Carpenter and contractor 

Assistant P. M 

Farmer 

Engineer 

Carpenter 

Wines and liquors 

J. P. and Notary Public. 

Farmer 

Benicia Brewery 

Farmer 

Contractor 

Superior in Convent 

S. D. in Convent 

Bl'ksmitbs & wgn. mkrs 

Parmer 

General merchandise 

Laborer 

Supt. Arsenal , 

Master workman 



Benicia Arsenal. 
Benicia 



Masterworkman.... 

Farmer 

Wines and liquors.. 

Farmer 

Prop. Solano Hotel. 
Farmer 

Bishop N.'Cai 

Farmer 



SHmil. 



■Whm 
umfl 
kSUla 



Ohio 

Pcnnsylvonia.. 

Vermont 

New York 

Massachusetts. 

Illinois 

Ireland 

New York 

Massachusetts. 

Switzerland.... 

Ireland 

Maseaehusetts. 
N. Hampshire, 

Ireland 

M assa eh u setts. 
Connecticut,.,. 
Switzerland.... 

Missouri 

Connecticut,... 

Ireland 

West Virginia 

Ireland 

Connecticut.... 

3[aine 

Pennsylvania.. 
3Iassachusetta, 
Now York 



Massachusetts. 

Ohio 

Now York 

Kentucky 

New York 

Missouri 

Ireland 

Virginia 



1858 
1660 
1800 

1852 
1840 
1840 
1850 
1870 
1850 
1660 
1855 
1851 
1860 
1850 
1850 
1849 
1850 
1849 
1650 
1600 
1855 
1851 
1867 
1864 
1866 
1858 
1662 
1860 

estb 
1870 
1854 
1846 
1860 
1849 
1850 
1850 
1874 
1860 



Wlun 
toCU. 



1864 
1860 
1854 

'1868 
1849 
1650 
1853 
1871 
1858 
I860 
1855 
1861 
1868 
1850 
1850 
1849 
1850 
1855 
1850 
1850 
1856 
1854 
1867 
1864 
1866 
1858 
1852 
1868 

1851 
1870 
1860 
1847 
1850 
1863 
1650 
1856 
1675 
1858 



Benicia. 



la. of 
Icm. 



80 
100 



260 

652 



426 
2200 



80 



110 
56 



64 

80 



80 



axosirxBZi^axA "pow^shs^ 



Bitrkway, R, H 

Bird, John 

Blythc, Jamea 

Bonder, Charles 

Cnllnghan, 31 

Delehanty,Edm... 
Donell, Wm 



usiDmn. 



Montezuma.. 
Collinsville... 



MuotcEuma. 



Bnsuiss. 



Fanner 

Warehouse. 
Farmer 



itlTiniT. 



England 

New York., 

Scotland 

New York., 
Ireland.. 



VIUD 

ami 
loSUU 



1853 
1850 
1853 
1806 
1866 
1860 
1868 



Tbia 
(tat 
talk 



1866 
1865 
1867 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1863 



POST-OFFICB. 



Bio Visto.... 
Collinsville.. 



Donverton.. 






310 

820 
820 
840 
101 
820 



Galbraith, James. 
Hooper, Thos. T... 

Moin, Robert 

Muzay, E. L 

Pratt, L. A 

Sullivan, Wm 



Montezuma.. 



Farmer. 



Warehouse. 
Farmer 



KltmiT. 



Pennsylvania., 
Mnssachusetts, 

Now York 

3Iaine 

Massac husetta, 
Ireland 



ama 
I0SL1I1 



1850 
1850, 
1860 
185G 
1856 
1854 



\eCa. 



1860 
1850 
1860 
1859 
1850 
1860 



■Si. it 
lata. 



Collinsville., 



Rio Vista.. 



334 
1040 
133 
000 
200 
360 



i 



68 



RIO VISTA 



TO-WMTS^X^- 



Alsi]i,A. B 

Itcguhe, Dnvid 

Bowman, W. J 

Unn4on, C. P. 

Butler, O. H 

Butler, N.C 

Bruiilng, JoiRpli."- 

Canricht, F. P 

Cameron, J. W 

Carter, llobert C... 
Ciirrio, Aloxnndor., 
CltirridEi!i Geo. A... 

Crowclf, A. B 

Dnvin, Chftrlos 

Dodcr, E.C 

Ek'bLTt, O. P 

BniJgh, T. P 

Ewidf, Wm. B 

Forgiisofi, Wm...... 

Gurdinor, John H.„ 

Glenn, J. H 

Hiidli-'j, JumcaT... 

Iliidluy, 8, T 

nfimrrioUl Jnnics,... 
Unnpo, Jnlni 
Uicklin, B... 



Rio VUU. 



UU>DC& 




Furmor- 



Qrain dcnicr 

Former 

Prop, wnter works. 

Pormcr 

Hotel proprietor.... 

pflrmor 

Builder 

Former 



Mcrclmnl ■ 

Fnrmer ■ 

^Carriuge mnkor.... 
Farmer..... 



Blacksmith & Jobbing. 



Maryland.—. 

Germany 

Maine- 

Denmark 

Caniida 

Tennessee 

Qcrninny 

New York 

TcnncsBce 

England 

N. Brunsivifk. 
3Ifle?ncliu-<!tt«. 
N. Hurapiliire 

England 

S. Carolina — 
New York 

Culiforniii 

Canada 

New Jersey... 

California 

Now York 



18J>8 
18G5 

1858 
1871 
18fi0 
1850 
18M 
l«54 
186!) 
1852 
lfl«7 
1849 



1857 
1807 

186a 

1875 
1810 
1852 
18-38 
1SG>1 
1800 
1859 
18157 
1858 



Bio Vista. 



1850:1869! 



Germany.. 
Missouri,. 



18H6 
18139 
1849 
18C2 
18GG 
ISGd 
1840 
1854 
18G3 
1850 
1851 
185G 
1849 



18091 
1800 
1866 
1807 
180G 
18'J7 
18(10 
1864 
1859 
1808 
1851 
1807 
1856 



783 
100 
475 



820 
SCO 
IGO 
820 

IGO 

240 



4500 

720 

1420 
■180 

460 

80 

lao 

820 



Hdlmes, N JH'" 

Howard, C. W | 

IngorsoU. John D— 

James, Wm. B 

Johnsi'n, James— .- 

Jobnson, J"hn 

McCormick, D 

MpLeod, James 

Mod'ail, John 

Ostrnnder, J. D 

Poiirson, J. S.-. 

Perry, James M 

Peteraon, A. H 

Piolrr-ycki, M.....-- 
Palmer, Lyman L.. 

Benvis, Wm. H 

Rogers, O. G 

Iliink, Mrs. L. C... 

Sidwtll, J.M 

Screnson, S. P 

Tryon, L 

Watson, llobcrt 

WnstgutoBroa 

Williams, W.T 

Young, Edmund.... 



Visla... 



Triitkman- 

Farmer 

Merchant. , 

Farmer 

Jtcrchunt.. 
Farmer 



Carpenter 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Warobouao 

Physician and surgeon, 

.Scboo! lenclior 

Mprchanl 

Farmer 

Hotel keeper 

Saloon 

Furniture dealer 

Staek and dairyman 

Farmer. 

Merchants 

Farmer 



Toxns 

England 

Canada 

Denmark 

Pennsylvania. 

Scotland.- > 

Novo Scotia.,,, 
Massachusetts 

New York , 

Missouri 

Illinois 

Denmark 

Poland 

Illinois 

N. Carolina... 

Now York 

Canada 

Ohio 

Di-nmurk , 

Connceticiit... 

Scotland ■ 

Ohio 

England 

New York 



MM 

(eSuU 



IvCs. 



1853 1870 
18i'>2 18G5 
1860^1862 

1811211807 
1852! 1856 
18r>4';1608 
18li7jl607 
18*17 18G8 
1850 1860 
18751 1875 
1853|166it 
1853 1869 



Itio Visio.. 



ISfiG 
1807 

1878 
18G5 



18G0 
1873 
1878 
18GD 



icroL 



130 
379 



100 
820 



217 



1852 1876 

1852,1870 
1862 1853 
1863' 1870 
1850 1866 
18081868 
1660 18G0 
1862 1868 
1805il866 



906 
200 



100 
278 



BEWVEBLTOW TOWWSKI^ 



BBIIIIIIOL 



Arnold, G. C 

Bornes, Natban,.,,.. 
Bilhell, Zachurio.... 
Carrington, John B 

Dnniiil?, G, N 

Depu;j', S. H 

Dutrcills, John 

Garfleld, C. E 

Uttgun, Patrick 

ICoiroe, John 

Lombie, John 

Larson, S 



Denver ton, 



Parmer. 



SiTITiTI- 



ant 



IllinoiG 

Ohio 

Now York.. 

Indiana , 

Maine 

New York.. 

Fronce 

Ohio 

Ireland 

Obi 

Norway 



1853 
1854 
1850 
1862 
1855 
1854 
1859 
1852 
160S 



POSMmflB. 



Denverton.. 



1853 

1850 " 

186U " 

1857 '• 

1858 " 
1872 Collinsvillo. 
1802|DonTOrton... 
1867 " 
186SlRio Vislu.., 

18G0il8G4| " 

1854' l854:Denverlon.. 

1851 1867 " 



SlI.Dt 
ItKf. 



400 
820 
1440 
470 
160 
240 
170 
160 
160 
320 
100 
320 



SUE. 



Morrill.W. D 

Moses, Prod 

Mii/./.y, L 

Kelson, C. A 

Nursp, S. K 

Spencer, William. 

Stewart, John 

Stewart, Samuel... 
Stewart, William. 
Sullivan, Daniel... 
Tormcson, Carl.... 
"Wockwerth, A.... 



RSIDEHOE. 



Denvo on. 



Fnrmer. 



and merohont.. 



KMiraT. 



ami 

mSUk 



Maine 

New Jersey-. 

Norway 

New York... 

Ohio 

Scotland 

Ohio 

Ireland 

Norway 

Prussia 



1873 
1858 

1858 
1849 
1854 

18S7 
1819 



1873 
1875 

i'867 
1840 

1854 
1808 
1850 



Denverton.. 



Rio Tiflta... 
Denverlun.. 



1849|]861 " 

1855:1857 " 

1854 1854 " 

1800 1864, Bio Vialo.. 



Va.tt 
Inn. 



820 

1720 
800 
ICO 
800 
160 
160 

3500 
480 
800 
320 
E20 



^£iE:ssos9rir xo^wisfshs^- 



tuns. 



Adams, F. H 

Agee, C. C 

Boyens, Peter.... 
Bouchard, Andrew, 

Buhmann, D 

Bulkley, B 

Cloiilmun, J. F , 

Fcndner, Valentine 

Foster, G. W 

Guthrie, B. J 

Herbert, W. B 

fio&'ner, Louis 



Tremont.. 



Farmer. 



Foster Station 

Tremont.... 



Sheep raiser 

Farmer 

Mechanic 

Parmer 

Farmer and warehouse... 
Farmer 



siTmn, 



iiat 
loStiU 



JIaBsachusoltfl. 

Virginia 

Prussia 

Canada 

Germany 

How York 

N. Hampshire. 

Prussia 

Jlissouri 

Virginia 

Maryland 

Germany 



1850 
1849 
1866 



ami 



Dixon , 



1860 

18G5 

18GS 
1860,1802 
180lll861 
1852 1 1860 

1849 1861 
1853] 1854 
1853 185G 
1862 1854 

1850 1 803 
1808,1869lDi5on 



»ST.cm!IS, 



DllTlJn'li.,Yo1[)CQ 

Dixon 

Duljt'lc.YolDCo 



Fo.<r 

iCRL 



158 
962 
160 
1500 
160 
480 
50 
320 
820 
831 
160 
320 



Holdridge, Ambrose 

Hyde, S. F 

Hyland, Wm 

Mcir, John 

Miller, James 

Kcid, Wm 

Rogers, A. W 

Snead, S. M 

Tbodt, Christian.... 

Tufts, J. B 

Wester, Martin... 



Tremont. 



Farmer. 



Pees. Dison Bank 
Farmer 



Fruit raiser 

Farmer 



siimrr. 



Vbta 



Connecticut.... 

Vermont 

Irolanil 

Germany 

Scotland,.. 

Tenne^^seo 

Connceticut.... 

Virginia 

Gemiimy 

New York 

Germany..., 



Wbfn 
ami 
In Co. 



POSMmCt 



1857 1868 Dixon 

18pj2|1854 D.ivi.Vle.ToloCo 

185C|1859 Dixon 

1866 1856 

1852 1854 

186711873 

18&2>1803 iniTinr-ic.VaioCo 

1849il854!Dixon 

1863 18G3i " 

1849 1855 Davbi'kYoloCo 

1861 I860' 



to. el 
icrs. 



600 
284 
160 
320 
800 
154 
160 
480 
160 
12 
700 



BXA.XNE ^RAIRSE XO-«r WSIKX:^. 



Bell, J. M 

Bennett, Albert 

Bcntloy, H. N 

Brown, D. B 

Brown, O. A 

Brown, tibermaii ... 
Christenson, Chas,.. 

Edwords, Jaa.„ 

King, J. A. J 

Lewis, James H 

Morithew, 0. H 



Maine Prairie. 



Former 



and blaeksmitb. 



Hotel keeper... 
Merchant 



WTmri. 



USUU 



Ohio 

Connecticut ... 

New York 

N.Hampshire. 

Massachusetts. 

Sweden 

Cape Breton.., 

Mississippi 

Scotland 

California 



1861 
1S52 
1857 
1852 
1857 
1852 
1854 
1859 
1853 
1866 
1852 



When 
111 Co. 



1873 
1863 
1862 
1302 
1864 
I SOI 
1855 
1862 
18511 
1807 
1852 



Binghaniton. 
Maiao Pra... 
Binifhamtan. 



Elmirn 



Dixon , 

Maine Pra... 



Ko-ot 
Icrn. 



160 
320 
320 
IGO 
160 
660 
160 
320 
320 
160 



McElwaine, W. J.. 

Miles, John A 

Petrus, P.W 

Plummer, Chas. E. 

Porter, F. J 

Eavn, Cyrus , 

Bust, Jesse 

Stcworl, Chas 

Triplett, Samuel.... 
Vonpelt, E 



Maine Prairie.. 



Farmer. 



Blacksmith 

Farmer 



SiTIYin. 



I -VUa I Tbia i 
ami tame 
IcSliU lo h. 



New York. 

Canada 

Missouri.... 
Michigan.,. 
New York. 
Ohio 

Scotland.... 
Virginia.... 
Ohio 



1852 1874 
18r,9|18G0 
18,5211857 
187l!l87l 
1855 1867 



1863 
1805 
1866 
1862 
1860 



1SG3 
1865 
1867 
1857 
1874 



Bingham ton. 
Maine Pro... 



Dixon 

liinghamton. 

Elmiro 

Maine Pro.., 

Bingham ton 



Ito.Qr 



840 
480 
160 
160 
IGO 
320 
163 
550 
175 
160 



ElUS^XE^A XOIRFWrSHI^. 



Allifiun, J. & Co 

Barrett, J, H 

Chandler, P. B 

Clark, Jumes A 

Davis, W^ B 

Farmer, Frank H... 
Farmer, W. G.,...„ 

Froet, T. Q 

Fry, Wm. H.... 



Elmiro . 



BDSIDESS. 



General morchundiso 

Notary Public & Just. oC 

Lumber dealer [Peace 

Farmer ■ 



and stock dealer., 
and teacher.... 



Fimni. 



Ohio 

New Jersey., 
Now York..., 
Kentucky.... 

Wisconsin- 
New York... 
Vermont 

Ohio 



(oSuti 

ostb 
1853 
1852 
1852 
1655 
1869 
1869 
1862 



Vhtn 
loCo. 



1870 Elmiro 

1867 " .... 

1870 " 

1668 " 

1855 Vocaville., 

1800 Elmiro 

1869 ■' .... 

1868 " .... 



1860 1862 



830 



200 
16G 

220 
IGO 

320 



Harkinsou, Chas,., 
Howkins, A. C...., 

Hyatt, A. A 

Mclntyro, Hugh,., 
Rogers, James R.. 
Weir, James C.... 
Williams, Frank.. 
WilmotjJ. D 



Elmiro. 



Fruitgrower 

Farmer 

Fruit grower 

Prop. "Hurley House"... 

Fanner 

Fruit grower 

Farmer , 

Minister , 



HIIITBT, 



Wien Wkca 
tsSUU IaCo. 



Pennsylvonio.. 

Virginia 

Connecticut.... 

Ireland 

Mi.ssouri. .,..,... 

Indiana 

Missouri 

Kentucky 



posT.(imtii 



1874ll874 Balavia..., 
1852j 18521 Vacovillc, 

1640 1871 " 

185-l|1857lElmira... 



185311863 



1873 
1864 
1873 



1874 
1854 
1876 



Vacavillo.. 



Elmiro.... 



r9.<if 

iaa. 



40 

1500 

49 

340 

85 

300 

80 



SSXS^EI^X.AXtEO'^Sl. 



Deming,Theo „ Lakeport... 

Long, George R Sun Fronciaco 



j-arroor 1655 1874 Lakeport,Lako Co 841 

Contractor N. Hampshire, 1668 1868 San Froncisco 10 



WttD 

oat 
Ufiuu 



Bo. of 
Icra, 



"Winters, Theo. 



Putoh Creek., 



Farmer and stock raiser. 



Illinois,, 






1840 



Via 
to Co, 



1865 



FOST.aF(ICI, 



Winters, Yolo Co, 



lam. 



870 



\